CHILDREN OF THE CLERGY

Victorian Studio Photos
Victorian Studio Photos

PART 1 - BOCKETT

Rev Benjamin Bradney Bockett
Rev Benjamin Bradney Bockett
Photograph by Cuthbert John Hopkins, courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

It is documented elsewhere on this website how Benjamin Bradney Bockett, subsequently Vicar of Epsom for over 40 years, virtually kidnapped (although she was a willing victim) Fanny Skinner Bramwell and married her. At the time Benjamin was 'of St John's College, Oxford' and not yet a fully-fledged clergyman - his first curacy commenced in 1832 at Rousham, Oxfordshire. We also know that he could be difficult and irascible (tap his name into the Search Box on this website for examples), but we have not said much about the children, which omission we shall now rectify. They were as follows.

NameDates
Benjamin Robert30.8.1830-19.6.1912
Augusta Champneys1833-20.7.1925
Julia Fanny21.7.1835-3.12.1892
Henry Pugh2.8.1838-6.8.1894
Edward Arthur Bradney4.7.1840-31.3.1916
Sarah Dorcas4.7.1842-19.7.1926
John Bradney5.3.1844-3..5.1846
George William Alfred13.3.1846-15.11.1875
Francis Vernon23.8.1851-1.8.1933

Benjamin Robert


Since Benjamin Junior, born in Tunbridge Wells, was the first child, we cannot say that he broke the mould, but he doesn't seem to have toed the party line for a Bockett offspring (perhaps he inherited some of his father's buccaneering spirit from the 'kidnap' episode). In fact, he is unfindable until he turns up at the Epsom Vicarage in the 1861 census, described as 'vicar's son'. However, his marriage certificate from 10 March 1862 (Stepney; marriage not performed or witnessed by his father - draw your own conclusions) reveals him as a mariner. The bride was Charlotte Annie Dearing, apparently born c.1838 in Washington, Sussex, her father, Richard, being a brickmaker. So, had Benjamin Junior run away to sea as a boy? At any rate, it seems that he was indeed nautical, as his first child, Eva Mary, was born in 1863 on board ship off the Cape of Good Hope - or were they emigrating? Emigration seems unlikely, as they were in Brighton by the following year.

In the 1871 census they were still in Brighton, with several more young children, and Benjamin was a painter. In 1881 they had gravitated to Runcton, which was then and still is a hamlet near Chichester, with Benjamin now a 'retired mariner', and they were still there in 1891. By 1901 they were in Chichester proper with five unmarried thirty-something daughters on their hands (something which Benjamin Senior never allowed, as you will see shortly) and the same applied in 1911, with Junior now aged 81: he expired on 19 June 1912. Charlotte lived on until 1930, then residing in Angmering.

Augusta Champneys


Augusta Champneys Bockett
Augusta Champneys Bockett
Photograph by Cuthbert John Hopkins, courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

As I have mentioned thirty-something daughters who were still at home, Augusta, who was born in Steeple Aston, Oxfordshire, seemed to be heading that way. (If you're wondering where the Champneys came from, she was christened by a Reverend Champneys and there seemed to be several of that ilk connected with Oxford University.) On 30 July 1861 at St Martin's, Epsom Augusta married John Richard Vernon of Sellindge, Kent. John was a son of the Rev. William Hardy Vernon, curate of Sutton, and was himself a clergyman, then being the curate of Sellindge. By 1871 he was parish priest of Stogumber in Somerset and the children had begun to arrive.

I don't know quite what was going on in 1881. John was now the Rector of West Quantoxhead, Somerset and Augusta's description as 'rector's wife' had been deleted. She was probably asserting a bit of independence - she looks quite assertive in the photo - and I believe that she was running a school at the Rectory, since there was a governess for her own children and then an assortment of teenaged scholars, including one from Ewell. The 1891 census confirms that there was a school, with 24 year old son, Cyril Vernon, as a tutor and no mention of Augusta being the rector's wife, although she was. There was another selection of teenagers, a couple of them being relatives. The thought occurred to me just then that the Rectory must have been big and I see on the internet that 'The Old Rectory' is still there: it is indeed very large, in a lovely position overlooking the sea and can sleep 19 people (I am not advertising it, but was just trying to see how the Vernons, their children, assorted servants and those teenagers could fit in - Augusta seems to have been running a boarding establishment in a very nice spot, with education, rambling and paddling included).

There was still a fair-sized houseful in 1901, but on 30 September 1902 John died, aged 69, and Augusta then moved to Melcombe Regis, Dorset, where she lived with just a companion and a servant. And thence to Minehead, where she died on 20 July 1925 at the grand old age of 92.

As you will have gathered, I am not intending to 'do' all children of the children - there were a lot -but I should just mention two of Augusta's offspring. Cyril John Vernon (1866-1950) graduated from his father's alma mater of St John's, Oxford, became a clergyman and was in 1911 the Vicar of Headley, near Epsom, so the wheel had nearly turned full circle there. Harold Anselm Bellamy Vernon (1874-1945) was in the Indian Civil Service and a Member of the Board of Revenue, Madras: he was awarded the honour of Companion of the Most Exalted Order of the Star of India in 1930.

Julia Fanny


Julia Fanny Bockett
Julia Fanny Bockett
Photograph by Cuthbert John Hopkins, courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

Julia was born in Rotherfield, Sussex and was whisked to the altar of St Martin's on 18 August 1857, when aged just 22. It's impossible to know if the husband would have been the bride's own free choice or if she might have been nudged in the direction she took. Anyway, the groom was the Rev. Thomas Carteret Maule, newly-appointed Rector of Cheam, and aged about 40. Like Benjamin Bradney Bockett, he had been at St John's, Oxford.

By all accounts Thomas was an energetic and well-respected and loved rector. He and Julia had four children, being Harry Carteret (1858), Alfred (1860), Alice Elisabeth Fanny (1863) and Lilian Mary (1864). However, on 29 March 1867 Thomas died, which occasioned widespread grief and dismay in and around Cheam. The funeral service, held at Cheam on 3 April 1867, was conducted jointly by the Rev. John Richard Vernon, his brother-in-law, and the Rev. Robinson Thornton, headmaster of Epsom College, many clergymen being present, except those who had pressing services of their own to conduct (the newspaper said). I could, but will not, reproduce here the report of the proceedings from the 'Sussex Agricultural Express' of 9 April: suffice it to say that the very long account was hugely touching and reverential but colossally overblown.

Harry Carteret Maule
Harry Carteret Maule
Photograph by Cuthbert John Hopkins, courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

Alfred Maule
Alfred Maule
Photograph by Cuthbert John Hopkins, courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

Mrs Maule with most probably Alice Elisabeth Fanny Maule
Mrs Maule with most probably Alice Elisabeth Fanny Maule
Photograph by Cuthbert John Hopkins, courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

Obviously, Julia had to leave the Rectory and in 1871 she was with her sister Sarah and Sarah's husband - see later - in Kew. Harry was at Cheam School and Alfred was attending Christ's Hospital ('the Bluecoat School'- then in the City of London but latterly in Horsham); the girls were in Southborough, Tunbridge Wells, in a house called 'Ebbisham', next door to the parsonage of the Rev. Henry Julian Bigsby. Tunbridge Wells tends to crop up a lot in this narrative.

In 1881 Julia was in Brompton, London with all the children. Harry was an Oxford graduate (BA, 3rd Class), Alfred was a clerk in a coffee broker's office and the girls were not described as anything but daughters. In 1891 Julia was at 22 Ventnor Villas, Hove (imposing house, still there but now flats - three servants, no children). She died on 3 December 1892, whilst on a visit to Lourdes.

Harry seems to have gone travelling (probably for work reasons) but surfaced in Bexley in 1901 as a Superintending Admiralty Clerk with an Australian wife; he died in 1940 in Suffolk. Alfred ended up managing a brewery in Norfolk and died in 1921. Alice married Bernard Edmondson Bishop (not a clergyman, despite the surname - he was a stockbroker) and died in 1933; Lilian married William Louis Hulsenbos Hamilton, a chartered accountant, and died in 1907, by then widowed.

Henry Pugh


Henry was born in Bedfont, Middlesex during his father's stint as curate of Feltham; Benjamin was probably marking time there whilst his wife's aunt, the wealthy Mrs Sarah Pugh, was orchestrating his new job at Epsom - see our article entitled The Advowson. It had been usual for Benjamin to officiate at the 1838 Feltham christenings, but on this occasion he handed the duties to someone else.

Henry was ensconced at Epsom Vicarage, described as a merchant's clerk, in 1861, but old Mrs Pugh had dangled a juicy financial carrot in her will to have her name perpetuated. Henry gobbled up the monetary vegetable and became Henry Pugh Bockett-Pugh, which sounds a Pugh too many, but by 1871 he was a 'funded proprietor', married to Margaret (nee Miller) with three small children and living in Winchester. The marriage ceremony had been conducted by Benjamin on 1 January 1867 at St John's, Paddington, at which point Henry was still a plain Bockett - Mrs Pugh had nearly, but not quite, died. By 1881 the family had moved to Clifton, Bristol and there were further children. Henry died on 6 August 1894 and Margaret on 12 January 1920. Henry was buried in Epsom Cemetery (Grave A110A).

We won't get into all the Bockett-Pugh children, but there was at least one noteworthy grandchild (son of Edward Harding Bockett-Pugh) and he was Commander, latterly Acting Captain, Ian Hamilton Bockett-Pugh (1900-82), who commanded the destroyer HMS Westcott during the Second World War and was tasked with testing a new anti-submarine weapon, called 'The Hedgehog'. In February 1942 HMS Westcott sank U-581 off the Azores and in November of that same year she sank the Vichy-French submarine Acteon. Commander Bockett-Pugh already had the DSO and a Mention in Dispatches and in 1943-44 he was awarded two bars to his DSO.

Edward Arthur Bradney


We have waited a long time for another Bockett clergyman and here he is, personally christened at St Martin's by his father on 31 August 1840 and personally married by his father nearly 30 years later. I sense reluctance on the part of Edward to follow in father's footsteps and he was probably leaned on. Initially he set up his marital home in Beddington and was described as a 'Private Secretary' with a BA degree from Oxford, but by 1881 he had joined the clerical club and was curate of St Mary's, Battersea; in the next census he was the vicar of St Thomas, Southborough, Tunbridge Wells. By 1901 he was at Medsted, Hampshire, now widowed, and in 1911 he was on his own, retired and living in Southsea. He died on 31 March 1916.

I have deliberately delayed the introduction of Mrs Bockett because she was from a family that lived in Epsom and we have a photo of her. She was Edith Amina Moates, born 17 November 1844 in Kennington/Lambeth, daughter of William and Henrietta Moates, who resided at The Parade until Mr Moates died in March 1867, quickly followed by his wife, who had moved to Dulwich, in 1868. (The wider Moates family will be the subject of a separate article.)

Edith Amina Moates
Edith Amina Moates
Photograph by Cuthbert John Hopkins, courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

Edward and Edith had three children, who were Harry Edward (1871-1948), Arthur Bradney (born and died 1874) and Edith Fanny (1877-1924). Harry married Maude Ellen, a daughter of Frederic Pagden, the Epsom brewer, in 1894 (she died in 1929); Edith Fanny married the widowed Rev. William Bevan Monger, originally from Wales, in 1901.

John Bradney


John was the only child who did not reach adulthood, dying on 3 May 1846, having recently attained his second birthday. He is buried in St Martin's Churchyard (Grave 557).

Sarah Dorcas


Sarah got married in Cheriton, Kent on 1 September 1868: the bridegroom was Miles Stapylton (born 1836 Chelsea but from a Durham family). I thought for a moment that Sarah might be the one who got away with marrying outside the clergy and family, but no. The groom's father, Robert Martin Stapylton, was married to Martha Eliza Bockett, an older sister of Benjamin Senior, so they were in fact first cousins.

Miles was an upwardly mobile official in HM Customs (London) and the family home was in Kew. There were several children and one of them, Bryan, born 1870, enlisted as a Trooper in the 68th Company, 19th Battalion, Imperial Yeomanry (Paget's Horse), but died of wounds at Lichtenberg, Transvaal on 13 March 1901 during the Second Boer War. Miles died in November 1924, followed by Sarah in 1926.

George William Alfred and Francis Vernon


I am indebted to Sarah Callen, Neil Montgomerie and Roslyn Eades (all descendants of the Rexworthy family - and Rosyln is a direct descendant of Francis Vernon Bockett) for permission to use their information and images in this section. All images are their copyright unless otherwise stated.

George emigrated to New Zealand, arriving in 1868; he purchased a small property and settled in Kaiwarra (now Kaiwharawhara), near Wellington on North Island. Evidently George liked his new life and his younger brother, Francis Vernon, joined him in 1871. Sadly, however, George died in November 1875, apparently after contracting typhoid from contaminated water, which was apparently given to him by Francis, something which the latter always blamed himself for. George is commemorated on the gravestone of his brother John in St Martin's churchyard.

Francis's godfather was the Rev. W.H Vernon, father-in-law of Augusta Bockett, who was almost certainly a friend of Benjamin's from their Oxford days. Rev. Vernon presented his godson with a book entitled 'The Bible and Modern Thought' on the eve of the latter's departure for New Zealand and it is inscribed 'To Francis Vernon Bockett, with best wishes for his welfare and happiness. From his godfather W H Vernon'.

On 14 May 1878 in Greytown, Wairarapa, near Wellington, Francis married Eliza Jane Rexworthy, who was originally from Stogumber, Somerset (the place where the Rev. John Richard Vernon had been parish priest, which suggests that Eliza could have known Francis previously). She then became a domestic servant in London. The Rexworthys were a labouring family and I imagine that Eliza could see little prospect of a bright future in rural Somerset. In 1871 her younger sister, Hannah, had pleaded guilty to stealing turnips from a local farmer; Eliza's father died in the Workhouse in 1876 and her mother, Sarah, then lived in the Alms Houses in Stogumber. Hannah and another sister, Emily, remained in Somerset, but an older half-sister, Elizabeth (who had been born to Sarah before the Rexworthys' marriage), took assisted passage to New Zealand with her husband, Henry Lenton Gray, and two young children in 1874. This was probably a case of 'come on over, we have prospects here', for Eliza followed in 1877, again on an assisted passage.

Gray House and Wheelwrights, Main Street, Greytown, where Elizabeth and Henry Gray lived.
Gray House and Wheelwrights, Main Street, Greytown, where Elizabeth and Henry Gray lived.
Copyright Image used with permission

Greytown Main Street c.1880s by Burton Brothers Studio.
Greytown Main Street c.1880s by Burton Brothers Studio.
Image source: Museum of New Zealand.

Francis's occupation on his marriage certificate was given as grazier (i.e. raising sheep or cattle). You wonder what Benjamin and Fanny Bockett thought of this New Zealand adventure and, in particular, the fact that Eliza was from such humble stock from the viewpoint of the clergy and gentry. Perhaps it was the emigration of George and Francis which finally led to Edward becoming a clergyman - after all, he was Benjamin's last hope of a next-generation Rev. Bockett.

Francis farmed at Western Lake, Wairarapa, and the family lived in a house named Ohui. Francis and Eliza had three children, who were Francis Edward Bradney (1879-1952), Harold Arthur (1880-1957) and Benjamin Bradney (1882-1972), all three of whom remained in New Zealand.

Francis Vernon and Eliza Jane Bockett
Francis Vernon and Eliza Jane Bockett
Copyright Image used with permission

Ohui, the Bockett home at Western Lake.
Ohui, the Bockett home at Western Lake. The person at the gate could be Eliza.
Copyright Image used with permission

Francis and Eliza retired back to Greytown in due course. Eliza died on 7 September 1922 and Francis on 1 August 1833. Both are buried in Featherston Cemetery, Wairarapa with their son Harold.

Grave of Eliza, Francis and Harold.
Grave of Eliza, Francis and Harold.
Copyright Image used with permission

PART 2 - VERNON


We have already met some Vernons (e.g. Rev. John Richard, who married Augusta Champneys Bockett) and they are not strictly in our bailiwick, but they are near enough. You may recall that Rev. William Hardy Vernon was the curate of Sutton (and previously he had been Rector of Carshalton) about the time John and Augusta married, There had been four sons who became clergymen, so he had done much better than Bockett in perpetuating the line, but he had a couple of girls left over, both of whom sadly predeceased him - he died in 1880. The younger daughter, Eleanora Elizabeth, managed to stay clerical by marrying Henry Francis Limpus, who was an organist and arranger (in the sense of setting poems to music and things like that), a minor canon and sometime Vicar of Twickenham. So now I will introduce the Vernon who bucked the system - the elder daughter, Henrietta Anne Vernon, born 11 March 1829.

On 12 February 1852 at St Nicholas, Sutton Henrietta married Otho (a variation of Otto) William Travers. Otho, who was originally from Deal in Kent, farmed Church Farm at Cheam. By the 1861 census they had five young children, being Otho Robert (8), William Howard or vice versa (6), Marian Henrietta (4), Nora Kathleen (2) and Vernon (1). They added Florence Mary (1861), Ernest Aston Otho (1864) and Lilian Ethel (1867) before Henrietta Anne died, aged just 38; she was buried at St Dunstan, Cheam on 9 January 1868. So, in the 1871 census there was Otho Senior, with eight offspring on the premises and his unmarried sister drafted in as housekeeper, with a nurse to assist Then, later that year he married Marian Carr of Cheam Park - her father, Isaac, had been tenant there. I am not at all sure that this marriage worked out, since Marian was not with Otho in the 1881 and 1891 censuses - Otho Senior died in 1895 - and I am 99.9% convinced Marian was the Mrs Marian Travers who lived on her own, with just a couple of servants, in Kent. I refuse to mention Tunbridge Wells again, but that is where she lived; she died in 1916, aged 92.

We have a nice photograph of one of the Travers boys, which we believe would have been taken in the early 1860s, so we think it is either Otho Robert or, more likely, William Howard. He is probably too old to be Vernon, unless the picture is later than we believe. If anyone knows which one it is, please contact the Webmaster.

One of the Travers boys
One of the Travers boys, either Otho Robert or, more likely, William Howard
Photograph by Cuthbert John Hopkins, courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

Otho Junior became a doctor; Florence married her first cousin, Lt. Arthur Henry Limpus RN (later Admiral Sir Arthur Henry Limpus); Nora and Marian died unmarried in 1922 and 1934 respectively; Ernest married Caroline Agnes Louisa Limpus (daughter of Henry Francis Limpus by his second wife). Vernon died in 1915 in Sekondi, Western Ghana.

PART 3 - BROOKS


The Brooks family of Woodcote Park were not particularly clerical but Walter, one of the sons of Robert and Hannah, became a clergyman. Walter was born in Norwood 1837/38 and, as a teenager, along with his slightly older brother, Henry, attended a school in Hampstead which was run by a clergyman. In the 1861 census he was in lodgings at Diss, Norfolk, described as having a BA degree (Trinity College, Cambridge) and being junior curate of Diss. He had been ordained a deacon at Norwich a few weeks earlier and this was his first assignment. On 16 March 1862 he became a fully-fledged priest and on 20 August he married Emily Grace Browning at Redgrave, Suffolk (near Diss).

Emily was the daughter of wealthy merchant Henry Browning, who for a time lived at Redgrave Hall, which may be how she came to know Walter. He was appointed curate at Hambledon in Hampshire and the couple's first and, as it turned out, only child, Ernest Walter, was born there on 30 August 1863. Tragically, Walter died suddenly on 29 December 1863, whilst at Woodcote Park, and this may well be a final or near-final photograph of him, as it was taken by Cuthbert Hopkins of Epsom at around that time.

Walter Brooks
Walter Brooks
Photograph by Cuthbert John Hopkins, courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

We shall continue with Emily for the moment, but Ernest will be back later. In the 1871 census both of them were at Henry Browning's house in Grosvenor Street, London, but in 1874 Emily remarried, her new husband being William Frederick Beauford, a civil service clerk (Exchequer) in London: he moved in interesting social circles - he was, for instance, a good friend of the artist, critic and director of the National Portrait Gallery, Sir George Scharf. Several children followed and William was in a position to retire before he was 50. In due course the couple retired to Eastbourne, where William died in 1923 and Emily in 1934.

Before we meet Ernest properly I must introduce Oscar. Oscar Browning was Emily Grace's first cousin and was rather notorious - a very colourful character who seemed to provoke extreme reactions of affectionate tolerance from some people and utter hatred from others. He has a long and entertaining biography by Richard Davenport-Hines in the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (ODNB) if you have access to that, and there is a more succinct version on Wikipedia. He was an important figure at Cambridge University for many years and, before that, a flamboyant, unusual, and some would say innovative, master at Eton College, which eventually sacked him, ostensibly for administrative inefficiency, but it's generally accepted that his sexual proclivities were the real reason. Apparently his close relationship with a young pupil, George Curzon, was the final straw. Whatever effect Browning may have had on George's psyche, the lad didn't do too badly, ending up as a Marquess and Viceroy of India.

Oscar Browning, as caricatured in Vanity Fair, November 1888
Oscar Browning, as caricatured in Vanity Fair, November 1888

Ernest


Ernest Walter Brooks
Ernest Walter Brooks
Image by Walter Stoneman May 1939 Source © NPG (NPG x165656) (cc licence)

It is impossible to say whether Oscar Browning's influence on Ernest was good, bad or a bit of both, but his biography by DGK Taylor in the ODNB speaks of Ernest's time at Eton, where he was an outstanding scholar. A contemporary there was Montague Rhodes James, who became a medievalist scholar and, perhaps more famously, an author of ghost stories under the name of M R James. James disliked Ernest and on one occasion arranged for a nasty practical joke to be played on him, which led to the intervention of the boy's step-father, William Beauford. This was just after Browning had been sacked from the College and it was known that James hated the man, so there were undoubtedly other factors involved.

Ernest then went up to King's College, Cambridge (Browning was already there) and apparently they became quite close and developed their relationship. He shone at Cambridge, earning a first-class in each part of the classical tripos and winning prizes. Subsequently he moved to London, basing himself at the British Museum, specialising at that time in the ancient history of Byzantium. However, his real claim to fame as a scholar was his translation of ancient texts in the Syriac language. It is hard to make this sound interesting for the average person, so I won't try. However, his work was of enormous value and revelation to historians and other scholars and was admired even by other eminent Syriac scholars.

An example of a biblical Syriac text.
An example of a biblical Syriac text.
Image source: Wikimedia Commons.

In 1927 Ernest received an honorary doctorate from the University of Louvain and in 1938 he was elected a Fellow of the British Academy. Late in life (1927) Ernest married: his wife was Ellen Amy Mellersh, daughter of a Major-General in the Royal Artillery. The newlyweds moved to Geneva but returned to England when Ernest retired from active research. He died at the War Memorial Hospital, Milford-on-Sea, Hampshire on 26 March 1955, aged 91. Ellen survived until 26 October 1963.

PART 4 - THORNTON


The Rev. Robinson Thornton D.D. was born in 1824 at Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, eldest son of Thomas Thornton who, amongst other things, had a long association with The Times newspaper as a journalist. In 1855 he married Elizabeth Gidley, born 1829, daughter of the Town Clerk of Exeter. There were five children, who were Caroline Elizabeth (born 1856), Beatrice Mary Robinson (1861), Dorothea Frances (1863-64), John Gidley (1867) and Robert Gidley (1868). The Rev. Thornton became the first headmaster of Epsom College in 1855, shortly before his marriage, and remained in that post until 1870.

Caroline Elizabeth


Caroline Elizabeth Thornton
Caroline Elizabeth Thornton
Photograph by Cuthbert John Hopkins, courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

Caroline was born in Epsom, but in 1870 she moved with her family to Scotland, following Dr Thornton's appointment as Warden of Trinity College, Glenalmond, near Perth. They were not in Scotland for very long and in 1878 Dr Thornton became vicar of St John, Notting Hill, where, on 27 March 1882, he conducted the marriage service between Caroline and John Sydney Malcolm Hastings, a barrister.

On 29 December 1889 Caroline's sister Beatrice died, unmarried, at the family home in Ladbroke Grove. Caroline and John Hastings had no living children (two had died very young) and generally lived in Kensington, but they eventually moved to Reigate, where John died on 15 October 1928, aged 88, followed by Caroline on 11 March 1941.

John and Robert


Both boys were born in Epsom and graduated from Keble College, Oxford University. In the 1901 census they were running a boys' boarding school at Walton Lodge in the village of Walton in Gordano, Somerset. By 1911 John had retired, although he was still in the area, but he then went back to Notting Hill and died, unmarried, on 18 August 1915.

By 1911 Robert had moved to the Meads area of Eastbourne, where he headed up a boys' school called Hill Brow: this looks to be a bigger establishment than Walton Lodge. Robert was Mayor of Eastbourne 1933-4, an Alderman of the town and a magistrate; he was also vicar's warden at St John's Church, Meads. He died in Eastbourne on 11 October 1937.

Linda Jackson 2018