The Glyns - Part 1

Part 1 - Sir Richard Glyn, 1st Baronet Of Ewell

The Glyns claimed descent from Cilmin-Droed, chieftain of one of the fifteen tribes of North Wales; his territory was called Glyn Llivon (later Glynllifon), stretching from Caernarvon to Clynog, and reference to this connection appears on the main Glyn tomb in the churchyard of St Mary's, Ewell.

The coat of arms of Cilmin-Droed was as shown on the left below1 with the Glyn coat of arms, using the double-headed eagle, on the right.

The Cilmin-Droed Coat Of Arms The Glyn Coat Of Arms
The Cilmin-Droed Coat Of Arms (left) and the Glyn Coat Of Arms (right)

The road from Glyn Llivon to Ewell is long and of no real relevance here, so we will pick up the line from the 16th century. This is the family which became the Ewell Glyns.

REV RICHARD GLYN, died 1617, rector of Llanvaethle and chapelry of Llanvwrogin in Anglesey
THOMAS GLYN of London
REV CHRISTOPHER GLYN 1596-1668, vicar of Burford, Oxfordshire, married Marjorie Needham
REV ROBERT GLYN 1623-1702, rector of Little Rissington, Oxfordshire, married Mary Davies
ROBERT GLYN 1678-1746, banker in London, married Ann Maynard
SIR RICHARD GLYN, 1st Baronet of Ewell

Before proceeding, we should look briefly at the Lewen family, since they are the reason that the Glyns became associated with Ewell.

The Lewens

Sir William Lewen (c.1657-1721) was a merchant, High Sheriff of London in 1713 and Lord Mayor in 1717. The family was from Dorset and his brother, George, had been mayor of Poole. William married in 1685 Susannah Taylor from Turnham Green in West London. Sir William purchased the Ewell Rectory in 1709 and from him it descended to Richard Glyn and family.

Lady Lewen was a 'lunatic' and on Sir William's death his Ewell estates were inherited by his nephew George, son of the aforementioned George Lewen. George Lewen Junior (MP for Wallingford, Berkshire, died 1743) was the father of Sir Richard Glyn's first wife, Susannah Lewen. Sir William was also the uncle of Ann Maynard, Sir Richard Glyn's mother.

Memorial to Sir William and Lady Susannah Lewen in St Mary's, Ewell Detail of Memorial to Sir William Lewen
Memorial to Sir William and Lady Susannah Lewen in St Mary's, Ewell2
Image courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

Portrait of a lady said to be Susannah Lewen, wife of Sir Richard Glyn
Portrait of a lady said to be Susannah Lewen, wife of Sir Richard Glyn.
Attributed to a follower of Van Dyck. Image source: www.wikigallery.org/

Richard Glyn

Sir Richard Glyn, 1711-1773
Sir Richard Glyn, 1711-1773
Painting by Zoffany,
Photo by kind permission of Charles Abdy © 1994 author of "The Glyns of Ewell"
Copies available from the Bourne Hall Museum Shop, Spring Street, Ewell.

Richard was born on 13 June 1711 and, like his father, was a drysalter (a dealer in chemicals and dyes, particularly those used in the silk trade) in Hatton Garden. He was a Sheriff of London in 1753 and Lord Mayor in 1758. He was also an MP for the City of London from 1758-68 and for Coventry from 1768-73. Having already been knighted in 1752, he was created 1st Baronet of Ewell in 1759.

His first wife was Susannah Lewen (see above), who died in 1751. Their only surviving son was George (1739-1814), who became the 2nd Baronet (see Part 2). In 1754 Richard married Elizabeth Carr (born about 1737), daughter of mercer3 Sir Robert Carr (1707-91) of Hampton, Middlesex and Etal, Northumberland, and their two surviving sons were Richard Carr (1755-1838), who became 1st Baronet of Gaunts (see Part 7), and Thomas (1756-1813), who features in Part 3.

Richard was co-founder of a prestigious bank called Glyn, Vere and Hallifax which, after several incarnations4, became part of the Royal Bank of Scotland. He was also at various times president of the royal hospitals of Bridewell5 and Bethlem6 and vice-president of the Honourable Artillery Company.

Scene of Bethlem from The Rake's Progress by William Hogarth.
Scene of Bethlem from The Rake's Progress by William Hogarth.

Whilst Richard undoubtedly had money of his own, he did acquire considerable wealth from the Lewens, having in 1736 received a very substantial amount from his first wife's dowry and, some years later, a legacy of Lewen property.

Richard died suddenly on 1 January 1773 and was succeeded by his son, George. Lady Elizabeth died on 14 April 1814.

Memorial to Sir Richard Glyn and family in St Mary's Ewell
Memorial to Sir Richard Glyn and family in St Mary's Ewell
Image courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

Linda Jackson © November 2011

Links to previous and next parts.

Footnotes

1. Source = Google Books via Wikipedia

2. This monument is noteworthy in its own right, being the last known memorial to an Alderman of the City of London to be erected with a life-sized effigy (per 'Late-Stuart moneyed men and their patronage of sculpture and architecture, circa 1660 to 1720' by Anthony Hotson)

3. Cloth merchant

4. I worked for this bank 45 years ago when it was Glyn Mills & Co and had no idea of its history.

5. Now King Edward's School, Witley, Surrey but originally an old royal palace in the City of London.

6. Known as 'Bedlam', the infamous asylum.

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