The Glyns - Part 2

Part 2 - Sir George Glyn And Sir Lewen Powell Glyn, 2nd And 3rd Baronets

The Glyn Coat Of Arms
The Glyn Coat Of Arms

Sir George Glyn

George was born in 1739, the son of Sir Richard Glyn and Susannah Lewen, and succeeded to the baronetcy in 1773. He was a graduate of Oxford University and a barrister.

On 3 April 1768 in Bath he married Jane Lewes, daughter of the Reverend Watkin Lewes and Ann Williams, of Pembrokeshire. Jane's brother, Sir Watkin Lewes (1740-1821), was Lord Mayor of London in 1780 and later MP for the City of London. Albeit that he made an advantageous marriage and thereby acquired extensive estates, he finished up in the Fleet debtors' prison and died in a nearby coffee house.

George and Jane had two children, who were Richard Lewen (born 1769) and William Lewen (born and died 1774).

In 1792 Richard Lewen became an Ensign by purchase1 in the Infantry. His rise in rank was as rapid as his career was short. In 1794 he was promoted to Major and on 5 July 1795 he was killed at the battle of St Domingo (Haiti), aged just 25.

Jane had died in 1790, so, on Richard's death, Sir George had neither wife nor heir. In 1796, when he was 57, he married Catherine Powell (born about 1770), daughter of the Reverend Gervas Powell of Langharan, Glamorgan, rector of Merthyr Tydfil. The Reverend Powell had only daughters, one of whom, Elizabeth, was married to a Richard Turbervill2, which probably accounts for the middle name of a later Glyn baronet.

George and Catherine's children were Anna Margaret (born in Weymouth in about 1798), Lewen Powell (born in Ewell 1801) and George Lewen (born in Ewell 1804).

In 1830 Anna Margaret married Dr Joseph Hamilton and they appear to have been in Ontario, Canada at some point. One of their daughters, Catherine Anna, married George Birch of St Petersburg, brother-in-law of George Lewen Glyn. Anna was widowed at a fairly early age (as was Catherine) and died on 28 March 1884 at Weston, Somerset.

It does appear that Sir George kept at least one foot in Dorset for most of his life, having land there and being an officer in the local Militia, but he had extensive holdings in Ewell too. He died on 4 September 1814. Lady Catherine Glyn died in Bath in 1844.

Sir Lewen Powell Glyn

Lewen was still a minor when he succeeded to the baronetcy in 1814. He spent a few years in the Army and then went on to half pay, eventually commuting that remuneration to a lump sum in exchange for relinquishing his commission.

Henrietta Street, Bath. 2007
Henrietta Street, Bath. 2007
© Jonathan Billinger and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence
Source: www.geograph.org.uk via Wikimedia Commons

It is not really known how often Lewen was in Ewell, but I suspect that his appearances were rare, and he can be placed with his mother in Henrietta Street, Bath in 1835. Lewen did not enjoy good health - he suffered from epilepsy - and was eventually admitted to Bailbrook House, a private lunatic asylum3 at Batheaston, Somerset, where he died of the disease on 28 July 1840, aged 38. He was unmarried. Both he and his mother were buried at Batheaston.

So, in 1840 the Baronetcy passed to Lewen's younger brother, George Lewen. As we have seen so far, the early Baronets retained their strong links with the South-West of England and perhaps could not be described as 'truly Ewell'. However, the 4th Baronet was 'very Ewell' and he will appear in Part 4.

Memorial to Sir George, Lady Catherine and Sir Lewen Powell Glyn in St Mary's, Ewell
Memorial to Sir George, Lady Catherine and
Sir Lewen Powell Glyn in St Mary's, Ewell
Image courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

Linda Jackson © November 2011

Links to previous and next parts.

Footnotes

1. It was common practice in those days for commissions and promotions to be bought/ sold/exchanged for money and the cost was considerable.

2. Richard was formerly Richard Turbervill Picton, brother of General Thomas Picton who died at the Battle of Waterloo

3. At this time epilepsy was poorly understood and equated with forms of psychiatric mental illness. In the early censuses for Bailbrook House every patient was uniformly described as 'lunatic'.


Adam Hogg
Adam Hogg
Hilda Andrews
Hilda Andrews
The Glyns
The Glyns
Gadesdens
Gadesdens
Journey Time
Journey Time
Thomas Tresize
Thomas Tresize
Blake Charles
Blake Charles
Blake Girls
Blake Girls
Barnards of Epsom
Barnards of Epsom
EW Martin
EW Martin