The Glyns - Part 3

Part 3 - Thomas Glyn And His Descendants

The Glyn Coat Of Arms
The Glyn Coat Of Arms

To recap, Thomas was a son of Sir Richard Glyn, 1st Baronet of Ewell, and younger brother of Richard Carr Glyn, 1st Baronet of Gaunts.

The Ewell baronetcy passed down to George, Sir Richard's son by his first wife, Susannah Lewen. Thomas was George's half- brother, by Sir Richard's second wife, Elizabeth Carr.

Sir Richard Glyn 1712-73, 1st Baron Glyn of Ewell
Colonel Thomas Glyn 1756-1813 Sir George Glyn 1739-1814, 2nd Baronet
Richard Carr Glyn 1794-1875 Sir Lewen Powell Glyn (1801-40),
3rd Baronet,
followed by his brother,
the Rev Sir George Lewen Glyn (1804-85),
4th Baronet
Henrietta Amelia Glyn 1829-1903  

Thomas was a career soldier in the 1st Regiment of Foot Guards (later the Grenadier Guards). He was a young Ensign when he was sent to the American War of Independence in 1776 and is known for diaries he wrote at the time, which were published. In that same year he was promoted to Lieutenant and was at the Battle of Princeton in January 1777.

Death of General Mercer at the battle of Princeton by John Trumbull
Death of General Mercer at the battle of Princeton by John Trumbull.
Image source: Wikimedia Commons

By 1792 he was a Lieutenant Colonel and in 1793 was at the Battle of Lincelles in Flanders, in a campaign known as the War of the First Coalition - the rest of Europe's first concerted attempt to repel the ever-escalating threat from post-revolutionary France. By the time of his retirement he was Colonel commanding the 1st Battalion of the 1st Foot Guards.

In 1788 he had married Henrietta Elizabeth Sackville Hollingberry (died January 1845, aged 76), whose father, the Venerable Thomas Hollingberry, was a Rector of Rottingdean in Sussex and later became Archdeacon of Chichester and chaplain to King George III. Thomas died in 1813 and was buried in the Glyn vault at St Mary's Ewell.

Memorial to Colonel Thomas Glyn and family in St Mary's Ewell
Memorial to Colonel Thomas Glyn and family in St Mary's Ewell
Image courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

Henrietta Elizabeth Sackville Glyn had inherited property in the villages of Henham and/or Sheering, Essex (near Harlow), via her mother, from a Mary Feake (not a relative), sister of one Samuel Feake, who had owned virtually all of both villages. There was another sister, Anne Feake, who left her half of the estates elsewhere. The whole business is extremely complicated but the upshot was that there were a fair few Feake legatees owning bits and pieces of the estates. (It is helpful to insert this link in the chain, to explain how a large part of this branch of the Glyn family came to leave Sheering and ended up in Hove.)

Memorial to Mary Feake in Henham Church, erected by Henrietta E S Glyn.
Memorial to Mary Feake in Henham Church, erected by Henrietta E S Glyn. Image © Jean McCreanor at http://www.flickr.com/photos/52219527@N00/with/4967868687/ and used by kind permission.

In the 1841 census the long-widowed Henrietta E S Glyn was occupying Durrington House in Sheering with her two unmarried daughters, Henrietta Elizabeth and Amelia Mary, plus her son, Richard Carr, and his family. One of her other children, the Rev George Henry Glyn (vicar of Henham for 23 years), was in the Henham vicarage with his wife. Another child, the Rev Thomas Clayton Glyn (1789-1860), was a few miles away in a village called Hatfield Broad Oak. Whether or not he regularly 'practised' as a clergyman is unclear (somehow, I think not), but he had been licensed as a curate of Hatfield Broad Oak in 1815.

St Mary the Virgin, Hatfield Broad Oak.
St Mary the Virgin, Hatfield Broad Oak.
Image courtesy Linda Jackson © 2011

So, at this point, the relevant people were concentrated in a few square miles of rural Essex. All of that was about to change. In 1844, just before the death of Henrietta E S Glyn, the Feake legatees agreed amongst themselves to rationalise the holdings and, as one result, Thomas Clayton bought out whoever else still owned part of Durrington House. He then moved in with his family.

Whilst on the subject of Thomas Clayton, I should mention his grandson, Clayton Louis Glyn, because he married Miss Elinor Sutherland from Jersey, who became the raunchy (for her day) novelist, Elinor Glyn. Clayton squandered his inheritance and the marriage was not successful. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elinor_Glyn

Mrs Elinor Glyn.
Mrs Elinor Glyn.
Image source Wikimedia Commons

The Rev George Henry Glyn remained vicar of Henham until his death in 1847, although he died in Brighton, where he was probably visiting family who had already left Sheering. His widow, Elizabeth, later married another clergyman.

Richard Carr Glyn

Thomas and Henrietta E S's son, Richard Carr Glyn, was born in London on 5 February 1794 and went out to India on behalf of the Honourable East India Company, where he was the Collector (of revenue) in Meerut, Bengal (now in Uttar Pradesh), housed in a spacious mansion. There he met Jane Florentia Creighton (born in 1805 in Meerut), daughter of local indigo planter Henry Creighton (died 1807) and his wife, Frances. Henry was also an amateur archaeologist and accomplished artist, much interested in the ancient ruined city of Gaur in West Bengal, and the British Library holds a number of his works. Richard and Jane were married in Meerut on 5 May 1828.

The Mosque at Meerut 1858.
The Mosque at Meerut 1858.
Image source: Wikipedia Commons

Jane Florentia Creighton/Glyn
Jane Florentia Creighton/Glyn
Image courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

It is necessary at this point to mention Richard's two spinster sisters, as they ended up entombed in Ewell: these were Henrietta Elizabeth and Amelia Mary, born in 1791 and 1801 respectively. Originally they lived with their mother at Durrington House, but vacated it after the 1844 division of the spoils. Dating their actual arrival in Hove, Sussex is hampered by the fact that on the night of the 1851 census they were inconveniently in Chelsea, visiting a former resident of Hatfield Broad Oak, but they very probably went to the south coast at around the same time as Richard, who was there by 1851. In 1861, Henrietta Elizabeth and Amelia Mary were living at 4, Lower Brunswick Place, Hove. Henrietta died there on 29 November 1867, followed by Amelia on 5 May 1883, by which time she had moved to 41 York Road, Brighton.

4, Lower Brunswick Place, Hove
4, Lower Brunswick Place, Hove
Image courtesy of Linda Jackson © 2011

We shall now return to Richard Carr Glyn. Richard and Jane had returned from India in the 1830s and, after Durrington House, they moved to 22 Brunswick Square, Hove , where they remained. They had just three children, who were Henrietta Amelia, Richard Thomas and Lydia Jane.

22 Brunswick Square, Hove
22 Brunswick Square, Hove
Image courtesy of Linda Jackson © 2011

The young Henrietta Amelia Glyn
The young Henrietta Amelia Glyn
Image courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

Richard Thomas Glyn

Richard Thomas, born in Meerut on 23 December 1831, was a career army officer who ultimately became Lieutenant-General Richard Thomas Glyn CB, CMG. Famously, and sadly, he was the Colonel commanding the 1st Battalion of the 24th Foot under Lord Chelmsford in the Zulu Wars. The catastrophe that befell the 1st Battalion at the Battle of Isandlwana in January 1879 is well-known and it was to haunt Richard for the rest of his days.

On 18 November 1856 Richard had married Anne Penelope Clements (born in Boulogne, France on 18 Jan 1834, daughter of Lieutenant Colonel Frederick William DePeyster Clements, 73rd Foot, ex Royal Canadian Rifle Regiment, and Alicia Frances Brickenden). In the 1851 Canadian census Anne was in Western Ontario, Canada with her parents and they returned to England in about 1854.

Colonel Richard Thomas Glyn
Colonel Richard Thomas Glyn

The diminutive Richard Thomas (5ft 2ins) served in the Crimea, was involved in the Indian Mutiny of 1857 (which, strangely, began back in his birthplace of Meerut), the siege of Lucknow and, as mentioned, South Africa, amongst other places.

The Relief of Lucknow by Thomas J Barker
The Relief of Lucknow by Thomas J Barker.
Image source: Wikipedia

Richard and Anne had five children, who were Annie Jane, Elizabeth Mary, Richard Oliver Cooper, John Keane Carr and Alice Farquhar. In the late 1860s Richard was posted to Malta with the 24th Foot and his only two sons died there. Richard Oliver Cooper Glyn, born in England on 27 February 1866, died at the age of 16 months on 17th June 1867 and John Keane Carr Glyn, born in Malta on 5 April 1868, succumbed to diphtheria at Villa Portelli, Kalkara, Malta on 5 November 1869. Both boys were buried in Ta'Braxia Cemetery (also known as Pietá Military Cemetery), on the outskirts of Valletta.

Eldest daughter, Annie Jane (died 1943), married in 1880 Lt Col William Maxwell Brander (died 1927), an officer of the 24th Foot. Elizabeth Mary (died 1956) married in 1892 Charles Henry de Winton of Brecon (died 1936). Alice Farquhar died unmarried in 1935.

Villa Portelli
Villa Portelli.
Image © Karl Borg at www.flickr.com/photos/albireo2006/5233862421/ and used with kind permission

Ta' Braxia Cemetery
Ta' Braxia Cemetery.
Photograph © Alex Vella at The Victorian Webwww.victorianweb.org/art/architecture/pearson/3.html.

Richard died in Hampshire on 21 November 1900 and his wife in 1927.

Ann Lydia Jane

Ann Lydia Jane, known as Lydia, was born in 1832/3 in Meerut and never married. She had premises at 1 Montpelier Terrace, Brighton, but in both the 1871 and 1881 censuses she was in Ewell and died there on 16 May 1886, only six months after George Lewen Glyn.

Richard Carr, Jane Florentia and Lydia Glyn
Richard Carr, Jane Florentia and Lydia Glyn
Image courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

She was the 'Lydia Glyn' who painted the delightful watercolours that appear in various places on this website.

Watercolour of Glyn House
Watercolour of Glyn House
Image courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

Richard Carr (1794- 4 Dec 1875), Jane Florentia (c.1805-23 July 1878), (Ann) Lydia Jane (c.1833-16 May 1886), Richard Thomas (23 December 1831-21 November 1900) and his wife, Anne Penelope (c.1834-25 March 1927) are all buried in this tomb beside the old tower of St Mary's, Ewell.

The Other Glyn Tomb
The Other Glyn Tomb
Image courtesy of Linda Jackson © 2011

A number of other relatives of Richard Carr Glyn are also buried at St Mary's. These are his mother, Henrietta Elizabeth Sackville Glyn (died 1845); his brother, Robert Spencer Glyn (a barrister, died unmarried in 1857) and his sisters, Henrietta Elizabeth and Amelia Mary (see earlier).

In the next part we will look at Henrietta Amelia Glyn, her marriage to Sir George Lewen Glyn and their family.

Linda Jackson © November 2011

Links to previous and next parts.

Adam Hogg
Adam Hogg
Hilda Andrews
Hilda Andrews
The Glyns
The Glyns
Gadesdens
Gadesdens
Journey Time
Journey Time
Thomas Tresize
Thomas Tresize
Blake Charles
Blake Charles
Blake Girls
Blake Girls
Barnards of Epsom
Barnards of Epsom
EW Martin
EW Martin