The Glyns - Part 4

Part 4 - Sir George Lewen and Lady Henrietta Amelia Glyn

To refresh the memory (yours and mine), I will show again the relationship and descent chart.

Sir Richard Glyn 1711-73
Colonel Thomas Glyn 1756-1813 Sir George Glyn 1739-1814, 2nd Baronet
Richard Carr Glyn 1794-1875 Sir Lewen Powell Glyn (1801-40),
3rd Baronet,
followed by his brother,
the Rev Sir George Lewen Glyn (1804-85),
4th Baronet
Henrietta Amelia Glyn 1829-1903  

Sir George Lewen Glyn
Sir George Lewen Glyn
Image courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

George was educated at Christ Church, Oxford and took holy orders in 1830. In 1831 he was appointed vicar of Ewell, an appointment which was in the hands of his brother, Sir Lewen, patron of the living. In 1836 he had built a new rectory, which is now part of Ewell Castle School, having been sold by his daughter, Margaret, more than a century later. He succeeded to the baronetcy on the death of Lewen in 1840.

The Rectory House, Ewell   (Glyn House)
The Rectory House, Ewell (Glyn House)
Image courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

George first married on 6 September 1838 at All Saints Church, St Marylebone, his wife being Emily Jane Birch, daughter of a Mancunian merchant, Josiah Birch, who lived in and operated out of St Petersburg and died there in 1868. Her mother was Maria Cazalet (died in 1867 in St Petersburg); Emily herself was born in Russia. Their children were George Turberville (born on 22 April 1841), Emily Catherine (1849-1920), Gervas Clement (born and died 1850, aged 20 days) and Jane Anna (1852-1855). Emily Jane herself died in 1854.

Memorial to Lady Emily Jane Glyn and daughter, Jane Anna, in St Mary's, Ewell
Memorial to Lady Emily Jane Glyn and daughter, Jane Anna, in St Mary's, Ewell
Image courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

Emily Catherine

In 1871 Emily married clergyman's son Alfred Deedes (born in 1845/6 in Bramfield, Hertfordshire), who was at various times a banker, freemason, Chairman of the English Board of Directors of the Anchor Tin Mining Company of Australia, High Sheriff of Bristol (1892), Justice of the Peace and Chairman of Directors of the Regent Street Pier Company (which built the Grand Pier at Weston-super-mare). They went to live in Somerset and then moved to the Manor House, Winterbourne, Gloucestershire, which had been purchased in 1892 by trustees acting for Emily1. The couple remained there for many years. In 1909 they left Winterbourne, to return to Somerset, but Alfred died in that same year, in Richmond district. Emily lived in the same fourteen-roomed house in Somerset (Yeo Meads, Congresbury) for the rest of her life, with just two servants for company. She died on 17 November 1920; there were no children.

Emily Catherine Glyn/Deedes
Emily Catherine Glyn/Deedes Emily Catherine Glyn/Deedes
Emily Catherine Glyn/Deedes
Images courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

George and Henrietta

On 5 May 1859, George married his cousin, Henrietta Amelia Glyn, in her home town of Hove, Sussex. The story of Henrietta's family has already been told in Part 3.

Henrietta Amelia Glyn
Henrietta Amelia Glyn
Image courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

They had five children, who were Anna Lydia (born in 1860), Gervas Powell (1862), Margaret Henrietta (1865), William Lewen (1867) and Arthur Robert (1870).

Glyn family photo c. 1870.
Glyn family photo c. 1868. On the left is the Glyns' long-time
servant and nurse, Mary Williams. Back right is George's eldest
daughter, Emily. Henrietta is front centre.
Image courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

Gervas, Arthur and Margaret will be dealt with in Parts 5 and 6.

William Lewen

William's life was tragically short. He was educated at Cheam School and Winchester and then went on to Sandhurst. On passing out, he was posted to Malta as a 2nd Lieutenant in the Dorsetshire Regiment; he never returned, dying there of meningitis on 13 August 1888. This must have been a particularly cruel twist of fate for his mother, since her two infant nephews had also died in Malta. William was buried in the same place as the children, Ta'Braxia Cemetery (see Part 3).

William as a child
William as a child
Image courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

William in army uniform
William in army uniform
Image courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

Anna Lydia

Anna Lydia Glyn
Anna Lydia Glyn
Image courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

One does not get the impression that the Glyn daughters were content to sit around the house, embroidering. The Glyns were enthusiastic travellers and in 1892 Anna went on a tour of Egypt and the Holy Land, but only after Lady Henrietta had interviewed the organiser, the Reverend Haskett Smith, over luncheon. On the way she stopped off at Malta to visit the grave of her brother William.

Anna in an outfit she bought on her 1892 holidays
Anna in an outfit she bought on her 1892 holidays
Image courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

The trip was not a luxury option, with the party often sleeping in tents and travelling by mule. According to her letters home, Anna would have liked rather more adventure!

Anna had two novels published: these were "Fifty Pounds for a Wife" and "A Pearl of the Realm". Sadly she did not live to see publication of the second book, for she died of heart failure on 12 December 1895, a few weeks after having eleven teeth extracted under chloroform.

Memorial to Anna in St Mary's.
Memorial to Anna in St Mary's.
Image courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

George and the church

During his early years as vicar George was much vexed by the state of the church which, to put it bluntly, was falling apart. An 1842 survey thought its condition so precarious that the bells should not be rung, lest the tower collapsed. In the 1840s George offered a piece of land and a £500 contribution towards a new church, which was finally consecrated in 1848. The plan had not been without opposition and he agreed to leave the old tower standing (which seems rather ironic, since this was the part that was supposed to be extremely precarious!) However, it did survive and is still there.

Ewell Church by Holman Hunt
The Old Church, Ewell by William Holman Hunt 1847.

The Parish Church of Saint Mary the Virgin, Ewell - 19th November 2005
The Parish Church of Saint Mary the Virgin, Ewell - 19th November 2005.
© Richard Blanch, Treasurer of the Organ Club of Great Britain.
Image source: Wikipedia

In all, George was vicar of Ewell for a staggering 50 years, although he was in poor health towards the end. He retired in 1881, died on 7 November 1885 and was buried in the family vault, beneath what had been the chancel of the old church.

Sir George in very old age
Sir George in very old age
Image courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

The Glyn vault
The Glyn vault
Image courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

Memorial to Sir George and William Lewen in St Mary's
Memorial to Sir George and William Lewen in St Mary's
Image courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

Henrietta Amelia remained in Rectory House in Church Street and died on 29 November 1903. She was commemorated with a plaque in St Mary's.

Memorial to Henrietta
Memorial to Henrietta in St Mary's
Image courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

Sir George Turbervill Glyn

Sir George Turbervill Glyn, 4th Baronet
Sir George Turbervill Glyn, 4th Baronet
Image courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

Virtually nothing is known about George, who succeeded to the baronetcy in 1885 and died of pneumonia on 19 May 1891, aged 50, at his home, 6 Montagu Terrace on Richmond Hill (although in all the censuses, including that of 1891, he was in Rectory House with the family). He was educated at Pembroke College, Oxford. Charles Abdy says in his book, 'The Glyns of Ewell' that George was rumoured to have a mental disability and that in his father's will he was treated differently from the other sons, suggesting that he was not thought capable of inheriting property or being a trustee. He died unmarried and without leaving a will, although, in truth, he did not have that much to leave by comparison to what one might have expected.

Memorial to Sir George Turbervill Glyn
Memorial to Sir George Turbervill Glyn
Image courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

Linda Jackson © November 2011

Links to previous and next parts.

Footnotes

1. Presumably bought with funds that had been left in trust to her under her late father's will.

Adam Hogg
Adam Hogg
Hilda Andrews
Hilda Andrews
The Glyns
The Glyns
Gadesdens
Gadesdens
Journey Time
Journey Time
Thomas Tresize
Thomas Tresize
Blake Charles
Blake Charles
Blake Girls
Blake Girls
Barnards of Epsom
Barnards of Epsom
EW Martin
EW Martin