Adam Murdie Hogg - Part 2


Enlistment and Embarkation

Adam attested into the Canadian Over-Seas Expeditionary Force on 18 April 1916, in Elnora at the age of 20 years and 6 months and was given service number 736966. He stated that he had been born in Scotland, and that his father Alexander Hogg was his next-of-kin, living in Elnora. He worked as a farmer and he was unmarried.

He underwent an Army medical on the same day and was considered fit. To quote the Army form:
He can see at the required distance with either eye; his heart and lungs are healthy; he has the free use of his joints and limbs, and he declares that he is not subject to fits of any description.
Adam was 5 feet 8½ inches tall, and had a fully expanded chest measurement of 39¼ inches with an expansion of 4 inches. His complexion was ruddy, his eyes were blue and his hair was brown.

Adam, 4th from left in a food queue at Calgary Camp, Alberta, 16 June 1916.
Adam, 4th from left in a food queue at Calgary Camp, Alberta, 16 June 1916.

The town of Lethbridge was the mobilisation point for the 13th Military District. The 113th Battalion (Lethbridge Highlanders) Canadian Expeditionary Force came into being on 22 December 1915, part of a recruiting drive that allowed men from the same region to enlist and serve together for the duration of the war - somewhat akin to the 'Pals' battalions raised in the UK. The battalion, consisting of 883 officers and men had its barracks at the exhibition grounds in Lethbridge.

Adam joined the 113th Battalion and would have received his basic training, lasting 14 weeks, given in the use of rifles and hand grenades as well as drilling, route marches and many inspections.

In May 1916 Adam's Battalion moved to Sarcee Camp near Calgary for further training that lasted until September. Whilst there they used painted rocks taken from the river bed, packed into sacks, to construct their battalion number, 113, on nearby Signal Hill in Battalion Park. Three other Battalions also constructed their Battalion number on the hill, using between them some 16,000 rocks. The Battalion numbers were still visible in 2011.

On 26 September 1916 the Battalion embarked on the transport ship SS Tuscania and ten days later on 6 October Adam was in England. The Battalion then went to Sandling near Shorncliffe. Here, despite the promise that they would remain together for the duration, they were told that they would not be going to France as a fighting unit but would be sent to various units as replacements. Adam was transferred to the 85th Battalion Canadian Infantry (Nova Scotia Highlanders), which was based at Witley Camp, Surrey.

SS Tuscania
SS Tuscania
Image source Wikipedia

Whilst in the UK, Adam visited relatives in Scotland when on leave
Whilst in the UK, Adam visited relatives in Scotland when on leave

Links to
Part 1 - Scottish Roots and Emigration
Part 2 - Enlistment and Embarkation
Part 3 - Active Service
Part 4 - Convalescence at Woodcote Park
Part 5 - Back to War


Adam Hogg
Adam Hogg
Woodcote Camp
Woodcote Camp
War Memorials
War Memorials
CWGC Epsom
CWGC Epsom
Sgt. Green and the Epsom Riot
Epsom Riot
Soldier's Penny
Soldiers Penny