The Lloyd Family of Cheam

Lords of the Manor of Ewell, 1609-1729

The Lloyd Coat of Arms
Lloyd.
Quarterly or and azure four harts countercoloured.

C J Swete, in A Handbook of Epsom, wrote about Ewell: -
"Whosoever desires to study the various vestings and descent of this manor, will profitably consult the work on Surrey by Manning and Bray. I would incline to pass on to the year 1538, when it appears, after various possessors, to have reverted to the Crown, and it was then annexed by Henry VIII. as part of that great chase which he joined to the newly erected honour of Hampton Court.
After the death of this grasping monarch, we find little change occurring in the manor through the reigns of Edward and Mary; but Queen Elizabeth, who seems to have been right royal in her munificence, presented Ewell, together with the Manor of Wights, to Henry Fitz-Alan, Earl of Arundel, whose daughter Joan was married to Lord Lumley, who dying without issue, his sister Barbara became his heiress. She first married Humphry Lloyd, secondly William Williams. Her son by her first husband, namely, Henry Lloyd, succeeded to Lord Lumley's estates,but not to his title, and from him the estates descended to Robert Lumley Lloyd, D.D., who presented a petition for a peerage on account of the reversion of the attainder which had been put upon Ralph Baron Lumley, attainted for rebellion against Henry IV, in 1409; his petition was rejected, his plea being found unsubstantiated by collateral facts.
The Doctor afterwards became Rector of St. Paul's Covent Garden, and dying without issue vested his estates in trust for his sisters, with remainder absolutely to Lord J. Russell, afterwards Duke of Bedford. In 1755 the Duke sold the manor to Edward Northey, Esq., who left it to William Northey, Esq., from whom it descended to his nephew, Edward Richard Northey, who lives at Woodcote House, Epsom, and to whom it still belongs."
The father of the Lloyd dynasty had in fact been Humphrey (Umphrey) Llwyd (1527-1568). His surname was rendered 'Lloyd' phonetically and later generations may be found mentioned in documents as 'alias Fludd (or Flood)'.

After the Church Settlement of Elizabeth, Cheam still remained a great recusant centre. Sir John Lumley, Lord Lumley (1534-1609), lord of the manor of Cheam, was accused of participation in the scheme to marry Mary to the Duke of Norfolk in1570.His residence,West Cheam Manor, stood in the centre of the village on the ground now occupied by the War Memorial.

John, Lord Lumley, died on 11 April 1609 and a white marble monument to his memory was erected at Cheam church in what became the Lumley chapel.

The Lumley Mumument, Cheam
The Lumley Mumument, Cheam
Image courtesy of Brian Bouchard © 2011

In the Gentleman's Magazine, Vol 154 (1833), at p.321, it was remarked in relation to the parrots, or popinjays, pictured above: -
"By mistake called hawks in Aubrey's History of Surrey, and also in that by Manning and Bray; although it had been corrected in the Appendix to Aubrey, Vol. V. p. 412, by a communication from the Rev. Lumley Lloyd; who also says that another of the ornaments of the tomb is 'a curious piece of graving, Cadmus lighting a dragon, a proper emblem of the Resurrection'; which Aubrey had called 'a curious piece of graving of St. George fighting on foot with the dragon'. It certainly looks in Lysons's engraving like the copy of an antique cameo; and Lord Lumley was not a Knight of the Garter. Mr. Lloyd adds, 'There is also a noble hanging of black velvet at the east end of the burying-place, whereon is embroidered in a lozenge the arms of Lumley and Arundel, with a border powdered with popinjays, above an hundred years old [1718]'. This must have been Lady Lumley's funeral pall*."
With his demise, the new Barony of Lumley, created by Act of Parliament, expired. At an inquisition post mortem of at Southwark on 30 May1609, his heir had been found to be Splandian (Ysplendion) Lloyd, son of Lumley's sister Barbara Williams. Splandian, 'aged above 40', died childless and was succeeded by his brother, 'Harri' or Henry (1).

On 1 June 1617, by Letters Patent of King James I a licence was granted to Hen. Lloyd to keep a market in Ewell, Surrey, every Thursday, also two fairs annually on St James' Day and St Luke's. [SHCOL_2238/10/145] A curious entry exists in the parish registers for 1654 of banns published in Ewell Market, preparatory to a marriage before a justice of the peace, Mr. Marsh of Dorking. In the 18th century Ewell fair had become "a very large fair for lambs, Dorset ewes, and other sheep; there [were] some cows, few neat cattle, many saddle horses, and but few cart horses, and some store hogs". It seems to have died a natural death early in the 19th century, the small market-house which stood at the intersection of Church Street and High Street having been removed at a slightly earlier date.

Cloudesley Willis, in A Short History of Ewell and Nonsuch, mentions a Popinjay Inn at Ewell about 1636 - popinjays, or parrots, were heraldic charges and supporters of John, Lord Lumley's arms as remarked in relation to the image above. The Lloyds' inheritance comprised the manors of Nonsuch, alias Cuddington, and Ewell together with East & West Cheam. Other assets including Lumley castle had gone to Sir Richard Lumley, Viscount Waterford, whose descendants became Earls of Scarborough. [www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=113797 ].

Henry (1) Lloyd, of Cheam, Surrey, married Mary, daughter of Robert Prowe, of Bromfield, Essex, and fathered Henry (2) Lumley Lloyd. Henry senior died in 'Cheyham', 5 January 1644.

A Marriage Settlement, involving the 'Manors of Nonsuch, West Cheam etc.', had been drawn up on 19 June 1630 in contemplation of marriage between the latter's son, Henry (2) Lumley Lloyd, and Isabel(la) daughter of Sir George (rather than Isham) Parkyns of Bonny (otherwise Bonney or Bunny), Notts. Henry (2) died 16 December 1646

Cheam continued to be known as a hotbed of recusancy long after Lord Lumley's demise and evidently Henry (1) was penalised for his adherence to Roman Catholicism. In 1650 Mary Flood (the widow of Henry (1), the lord of Cheam manor,) is found petitioning against sequestration of two thirds of the family estate, and on 1 August 1650 had the oath of abjuration administered to her. As Mary Lloyd, relict of Henry (1), she married secondly William Buggs after December 1650. In 1654 William Buggs (her second husband) still had to beg leave to contract for the sequestrated two thirds. Isabel Buggs, formerly Lloyd, nee Parkyn, died about 1681. Her passing was marked by:-
An heroick elegie upon the most lamentable death of the incomparable heroina, Madame Isabella Buggs: the much loved wife of Col. William Buggs, formerly widow to that worthy gentleman Henry Lloyd of Cheam, in com. Surrey, Esquire, and daughter to that honourable person Sir George Parkins of Bunny in com. Nottinghamshire, Knight.
Henry (3) Lloyd, of Cheam, Esq. who died 3 December 1704, aged 66, leaving Elizabeth, daughter of Benjamin Goodwin, of Streatham, (who died in November 1705, and was buried with him under the chancel* in the [old] church of Cheam)
Robert Lumley Lloyd, only son of Henry (3) of Cheam, had been born in 1666. Admitted to Pembroke, Cambridge, in 1683, he gained BA 1686 & MA 1690 - having become a Fellow in 1688. Described as "a man of eminent abilities, which were displayed even when a boy at school, where he became the wonder of those who knew him; but he did not pursue his studies with the same vigour at college. Indeed, his chambers at Cambridge exhibited little more than scenes of revelry." He published a poem addressed to King William, in 1689, and "distinguished himself as a zealous whig". After taking holy orders, he became Chaplain to the Right Hon. Richard, Earl of Scarborough and, on 12 October 1701, whilst Senior Fellow of Pembroke-Hall, preached a sermon at Great St. Mary's [the University church], before the University of Cambridge on 'Christian charity'. At the parish church of Epsom in Surrey he delivered another sermon "on Wednesday the 8th of March, 1703/4. Being the Day of Her Most Sacred Majesty's Inauguration" [A Church of England feast day revived by Special Order to mark the commencement of Queen Anne's reign - in the second year of it.] Rev. Lloyd was subsequently admitted to the rectory of St. Paul's, Covent Garden, by the Duke of Bedford [Installed during 1704 by Wriothesley Russell, 2rd Duke?]. Robert Lloyd married Martha Strong on 7 June 1708. He published eight of his sermons, including one in 1711 dedicated to "...her most excellent majesty Anne, rightful and lawful Queen as a testimony of unfeigned loyalty to her, and of unshaken zeal for the Revolution and Protestant Succession".

A sermon delivered on 30 January 1711/12 incurred resentment by the Tory party and resulted in the Rev, Lumley Lloyd being lampooned by Jonathan Swift in The Story of St Alban's Ghost. The cover of one of the satirical pamphlets from that time is reproduced below'

The cover of one a satirical pamphlet
The cover of one a satirical pamphlet

[The 2nd Duke of Bedford died on 26 May 1711; thereafter Rev. Lumley Lloyd became chaplain to Wriothesley 3rd Duke of Bedford and his mother, Elizabeth, Dowager Duchess of Bedford until her death in June 1724.]

On the arrival of Queen Anne's Tory Administration, he had been removed from the commission of the peace. Consequently, when
"A Sermon preach'd at St. Paul Covent-Garden, on the 5th of November, 1711 Being the Anniversary for the happy Discovery of the Powder Traitors: And our no less happy Deliverance, from the late Attempts of Popery and Arbitrary Power, by the Blessed King William of immortal Memory" was published, he described himself in the title page as "one of her Majesty's late Justices of the Peace for the said county [of Surrey],&c".
Rev Lumley Lloyd
Rev Lumley Lloyd
Mezzotint The Reverend and Honourable Robert Lumley Lloyd, of Cheam in Surrey, one of his Majesty's restor'd Justices of the Peace for the said County, Rector of St. Pauls Convent Garden, and Chaplain to their most noble Graces the Duke, and Duchess Mother of Bedford. J. Faber jun. ad vivum. 1719.
[From A Catalogue of English Heads 1748]

His detractors referred to the Reverend Doctor as nominal, so-called or self styled 'Honourable' but the arms displayed by the arms of the 'Hon. & Rev. R L Lloyd ' have been described as: - 'Lloyd Quarterly, Or and Azure, four Bucks trippant counter-charged, within a Bordure of the first, empaling Lumley as before. Lloyd, as before, empaling Gules, 1 Bars Or, between 6, Lozenges Arg. Goodwyn.

Robert Lumley Lloyd may have been ailing for some time before his demise. In a letter reported to have been sent by 'the former Rector of St Paul's, Covent Garden', on 13 October 1726, to the steward of the Duke of Bedford's Streatham estate, he wrote that '...I mightily desire to settle all my affairs before I die'.

Following his death, interment took place at Cheam on 1 August 1729.

It had been reported "Dr Lloyd had the character of a proud man, valuing himself much on his descent; was greatly attached to the study of botany, and was an esteemed florist." His gardens at Cheam were highly regarded.

The will of Robert Lumley Lloyd,'Clerk and Rector of Cheam', was proved on 2 April 1731- PROB 11/643. Swete tells us that the three Lloyd sisters, Elizabeth, Susan and Catherine, had been granted a life interest in the estate with remainder absolutely to Lord John Russell. The latter married in October 1731 Diana Spencer, daughter of Charles Spencer, 3rd Earl of Sunderland.

Shortly after their wedding, the Russells took up residence in 'Cheam House' having been granted, by Catherine Lloyd, a 21 year lease of the property from 16 May 1732 [SHCOL _2238/10/94]. When his formidable grandmother-in-law, Sarah, Duchess of Marlborough, had inspected the Cheam house on 2 April 1732, she considered it 'a very pleasing habitation, particularly as it was within half a mile of the finest downs and best air in England, and within two hours of driving from London '. Lord John Russell became 4th Duke of Bedford on his brother's death 23 October 1732, at Coruna, and having lost his first wife, during 1735, married Lady Gertrude Leveson-Gower in April 1737.

Apart from the institution of Ewell Market, the Lloyds seem to have made very little impression on this village. The old manor house was leased out as Ewell Court Farm and they appear largely to have acted as absentee landlords. A Court Book of the manors of Ewell and Cuddington covering the years 1723 - 1758 is held by Surrey Heritage - SHCOL_2238/10/171.

Brian Bouchard - November 2011


* This chancel became the free-standing Lumley Chapel. On page 412 in the Appendix to Vol. V of The Natural History and Antiquities of Surrey, John Aubrey notes "In the North East Side of the Chancel [of Cheam church is] (the present burying place of Mr Lloyd) [probably Henry(3)]. The author continues with an extended description of the memorial to John,Lord Lumley, and then writes: - "Nigh to this are the Arms of the Honourable Henry Lumley Lloyd Esq.,[Henry (2)] who bears Quarterly twelve Coats, with this Inscription, Dubia Prudenter Adversa Fortiter Secunda Moderate, with a Shield Head-piece, Mantle and Streamers &c. incribd. Murus Aeneus Sana Conscienta. According to a report in Surrey Archaeological Collections Vol. 3, p 321, from April 1865: - "The Lumley chapel contains several other monumental slabs relating to the Lloyds and other families connected with the place. Some, at least, of these appear to have been transported from their original position in the old church, being affixed to the newly-built west wall." Lloyd gravestones possibly remained as flooring slabs in the Lumley Chapel [former chancel of the demolished church] but no inscriptions to the memory of members of the family known to have been interred there appear to have survived. The funeral pall of Lady Lumley would have turned to dust long ago. 'Arms' of the Hon. Henry Lumley Lloyd [presumably his 'hatchment', a funeral demonstration of the lifetime 'achievement' of the arms (shield, helmet, crest, supporters) and any other honours displayed on a black lozenge-shaped frame. In the early 17th century, this custom developed from an earlier practice of carrying a heraldic shield before the coffin of the deceased, then leaving it for display in the church.] have also disappeared. The present parish church dedicated to St Dunstan was not built until 1864.


Adam Hogg
Adam Hogg
Hilda Andrews
Hilda Andrews
The Glyns
The Glyns
Gadesdens
Gadesdens
Journey Time
Journey Time
Thomas Tresize
Thomas Tresize
Blake Charles
Blake Charles
Blake Girls
Blake Girls
Barnards of Epsom
Barnards of Epsom
EW Martin
EW Martin