The Long Grove Psychiatrists Of 1911


Long Grove Nurses Quarters
Images courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

If you look at the 1911 census for the Long Grove Asylum there were seven doctors, including the Medical Superintendent. The other six varied in age between 26 and 37 and some were just starting out in psychiatry. What may surprise you is just how distinguished in the field of psychiatry several of these people became. For information about the history of Long Grove and other local asylums, please see Epsom's Hospitals Cluster

Postcard Aerial View of Long Grove Hospital
Postcard Aerial View of Long Grove Hospital

DR GUY FOSTER BARHAM (Medical Officer)

Guy Foster Barham, son of a merchant, was born in Bridgwater, Somerset in 1873. He qualified in 1901 and was at Long Grove until at least 1915. After that he became Medical Superintendent of the Claybury Mental Hospital, Woodford Bridge, Essex. He married Germaine Louisa Sophie Margaret/Marguerite Ceresole in Epsom district in 1911 and died in Cornwall on 30 August 1944.

Dormitory at Claybury Asylum 1893.
Dormitory at Claybury Asylum 1893.
Image source: Wellcome Images

DR CHARLES HUBERT BOND (Medical Superintendent), later SIR CHARLES HUBERT BOND

Clergyman's son Charles Hubert Bond, usually known as Hubert, was born in Ogbourne St George, Wiltshire in 1870. He qualified in 1892 and was at the London County Asylum in Bexley and the Banstead Asylum before being appointed Medical Superintendent of the Ewell Epileptic Colony (later St Ebba's Hospital) in 1903. He went to Long Grove in 1907, where he stayed for about five years. He was known for recruiting able young psychiatrists, some of whom you see on this page.

In 1912 Hubert was appointed a Commissioner in Lunacy and became Commissioner of the newly founded Board of Control in 1914. His career spiralled upwards until, in 1924, he and another doctor were sued for wrongful detention of a patient. He technically lost the case, but it was a contributing factor to a change in the law: the Mental Treatment Act of 1930 allowed mental patients to seek treatment voluntarily and also changed the term 'Asylum' to 'Hospital'. Hubert was a formidable administrator, a lecturer at the Maudsley Hospital (see Edward Mapother below) and a consultant to the Royal Navy on mental disorders. He was knighted in 1929 and died in Lancashire on 18 April 1945.

Hubert's wife was bank manager's daughter Janet Constance Laurie (died 1957).

DR GEOFFREY CLARKE (Medical Officer)

Geoffrey Clarke was born in 1877 in Chatteris, Cambridgeshire and qualified in 1901. After Long Grove he spent several years at the Banstead Asylum and then moved on to the London County Mental Hospital, Bexley (The Heath Asylum). He died in Salisbury in 1959.

Day room in the Heath Asylum c.1900.
Day room in the Heath Asylum c.1900.
Image source: Wellcome Images

DR ROBERT HENRY HATTEN JOLLY (Medical Officer)

Robert Henry Hatten Jolly, son of a GP, was born in Peterborough in 1884 and qualified in 1908. I do not know how long he was at Long Grove. He served in the RNVR during the First World War, rising to the rank of Surgeon Lieutenant-Commander. Subsequently he practised in the Midlands (e.g. Wolverhampton and Tettenhall, Staffordshire); he died in Sussex in 1968.

DR EDWARD MAPOTHER (Medical Officer)

Dr Edward Mapother
Dr Edward Mapother
Image source: The US National Library of Medicine

Edward Mapother was not an Epsom man as such, but the time he spent there was a priceless grounding for what he did afterwards. He was born in Dublin in 1881, son of Edward Dillon Mapother (1835-1908), an eminent surgeon in Dublin. The family moved to London in 1888 and Edward was educated at University College, qualifying as a doctor in 1905. In 1908 he became a medical officer at Long Grove, where he remained until 1914, and the experience he gained helped him to become a leader in treating psychiatric disorders.

During the First World War he was a Captain in the Royal Army Medical Corps, serving in France, Mesopotamia and India, where he had first-hand experience of treating shell shock and mental trauma caused by war; he subsequently trained in military psychology and commanded the neurological division of Number Two Western General Hospital in Stockport.

In 1919 Edward became medical superintendent of the war neurosis centre at the government-requisitioned Maudsley Hospital at Denmark Hill, London SE5; this closed in 1920 and he returned to Long Grove. However, he was at the forefront of getting The Maudsley reopened and put on a sound financial footing, returning as its superintendent in 1923. During the 1920s he was associated with the Ex-Services Welfare Society, but somewhat curiously demanded that this was not made public and refused to give an opinion as to whether the condition of mental patients was attributable to war service. In 1936 he was elected to the chair of clinical psychiatry at the University of London.

Edward retired from The Maudsley in 1939 because of ill health and died of asthma and pulmonary fibrosis on 20 March1940. He was succeeded at the hospital and the university by his pupil Aubrey Julian Lewis (later Sir Aubrey), who was a leader of post-World War II British psychiatry.

Edward's determination to specialise in psychiatry was perhaps influenced by the plight of one of his older sisters, Mary. He had had to have her admitted to the Bethlem Royal Hospital (the original 'Bedlam') for a two month period early in 1908, just before he went to Long Grove, and later she was a patient for three years, with spells at other institutions too. In the 1911 census she was in the St Andrew's Hospital for Mental Disease in Northampton and it looks as if she died in the Bethlem Hospital in 1947.

In 1915 Edward married Barbara Mary Agnes Reynolds, who died in 1945. There were no children.

DR JAMES ERNEST MARTIN (Medical Officer)

James Ernest Martin was born in London in 1878 and qualified in 1903. He seems to have been at Long Grove until the mid-to-late 1930s.

Male patients being washed by orderlies at Long Grove c.1930.
Male patients being washed by orderlies at Long Grove c.1930.
Image source: Wellcome Images

DR JAN MARIUS MOLL (Clinical Assistant)

Jan Marius Moll was newly qualified in 1911, having been born in Bloemendaal, Holland in 1879. Both his father and grandfather were psychiatrists. He seems to have been at Long Grove for just a few months, returning to Holland later in 1911, where he married Florence Ruby Mijiring. He emigrated to South Africa in 1912 and in 1916 began a series of senior roles in the sphere of psychiatric education. Jan had been blighted by bouts of a recurrent illness throughout his life and this eventually killed him. He died in Johannesburg in 1926.

Linda Jackson
December 2012



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