Lost Buildings
Part B
Cottages


In 2009 Bourne Hall Museum put together an exhibition of photos in Bourne Hall foyer, bringing back to life long-gone buildings of character that many argue should never have been demolished. Jeremy Harte, the museum curator, very kindly gave us access to the images which we have put on these pages.

Weatherboarded cottages were the standard model for cheap housing in 18th- and early 19th-century Epsom. Most of them are now lost, including these ones in East Street.
Weatherboarded cottages were the standard model for cheap housing in 18th and early 19th-century Epsom.
Most of them are now lost, including these ones in East Street.


Prospect Place was an early development of workers' cottages in the open fields. The oldest house was dated 1819. The whole street has been demolished and rebuilt.
Prospect Place was an early development of workers' cottages in the open fields.
The oldest house was dated 1819. The whole street has been demolished and rebuilt.


Early 18th-century housing became the Hop Pole pub in 1841. The site is now occupied by John Gale Court.
Early 18th-century housing became the Hop Pole pub in 1841. The site is now occupied by John Gale Court.
Link to our Public Houses page

No. 33/7 East Street (Tester & Tuck) was a row of 18th-century small housing, divided into three small properties.
No. 33/7 East Street (Tester & Tuck) was a row of 18th-century small housing, divided into three small properties.

The sweep's brush outside Tester & Tuck (33/7 East Street)
The sweep's brush outside Tester & Tuck (33/7 East Street)

The Black Cottages at the foot of Plough Road housed workers in the gunpowder mills. Weatherboarding like this was traditionally painted with black pitch, not white paint.
The Black Cottages at the foot of Plough Road housed workers in the gunpowder mills.
Weatherboarding like this was traditionally painted with black pitch, not white paint.

Link to our Gunpowder Mill pages


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