Lost Buildings
Part G
Pubs


In 2009 Bourne Hall Museum put together an exhibition of photos in Bourne Hall foyer, bringing back to life long-gone buildings of character that many argue should never have been demolished. Jeremy Harte, the museum curator, very kindly gave us access to the images which we have put on these pages.

A late 17th-century building, the Amato was the Rummer till 1838 when it was renamed after Epsom's Derby winner. It burnt down in 1922; the present building is a replica.
A late 17th-century building, the Amato was the Rummer till 1838
when it was renamed after Epsom's Derby winner. It burnt down in 1922; the present building is a replica.

Link to our Public Houses page

The Red Lion in East Street, originally the Queens Head, was frequented by 'respectable working class men'.
The Red Lion in East Street, originally the Queens Head, was frequented by 'respectable working class men'.
Link to our Public Houses page

The Queen Adelaide was for many years a cow-keeper's cottage and inn with a verandah by the roadside, until rebuilt for motor trade in 1932 by Watney Combe Reid.
The Queen Adelaide was for many years a cow-keeper's cottage and inn
with a verandah by the roadside, until rebuilt for motor trade in 1932 by Watney Combe Reid.

Link to our Public Houses page

In 1861 the Railway Hotel was built near the new station in Upper High Street. Local residents were concerned about the risk of drunkenness among racegoers and railwaymen.
In 1861 the Railway Hotel was built near the new station in Upper High Street.
Local residents were concerned about the risk of drunkenness among racegoers and railwaymen.

Link to our Public Houses page

Epsom's first major building, the Kings Head dominated the High Street until it was pulled down for shopping in 1957.
Epsom's first major building, the Kings Head dominated the High Street
until it was pulled down for shopping in 1957.

Link to our Public Houses page

The Kings Head was trading in 1662, perhaps named to celebrate the return of Charles II. It was a courtyard inn until 1838 when an Assembly Room was built at the front.
The Kings Head was trading in 1662, perhaps named to celebrate the return of Charles II.
It was a courtyard inn until 1838 when an Assembly Room was built at the front.

Link to our Public Houses page

The Kings Head
The Kings Head
Link to our Public Houses page

The original Jolly Waggoners, a house of c.1850 made into a pub. Mill workers and farm carters used to drink here.
The original Jolly Waggoners, a house of c.1850 made into a pub. Mill workers and farm carters used to drink here.
Link to our Public Houses page

The Bonesgate was a country cottage until Mellersh & Neale made it into a more ambitious roadside pub in 1933.
The Bonesgate was a country cottage until Mellersh & Neale made it into a more ambitious roadside pub in 1933.
Link to our Public Houses page

In the 1950s the Waggoners was rebuilt as an open-plan pub, but its out-of-village location proved to be bad for trade and the site was redeveloped for housing in 2001.
In the 1950s the Waggoners was rebuilt as an open-plan pub,
but its out-of-village location proved to be bad for trade and the site was redeveloped for housing in 2001.

Link to our Public Houses page

Built as part of the early 18th-century development of the High Street, the George was later renamed to show Epsom's  patriotic support for the first Hanoverian king
Built as part of the early 18th-century development of the High Street,
the George was later renamed to show Epsom's patriotic support for the first Hanoverian king

Link to our Public Houses page

In 1937, when Epsom High Street was widened, the George was rebuilt on a grand scale to match the Odeon next door. Both properties were demolished in 1972.
In 1937, when Epsom High Street was widened, the George was rebuilt on a grand scale
to match the Odeon next door. Both properties were demolished in 1972.

Link to our Public Houses page

A brewery for ale and porter was built by James Bradley at the back of the High Street. It disappeared when Epsom's industrial area was redeveloped for the Ashley Centre.
A brewery for ale and porter was built by James Bradley at the back of the High Street.
It disappeared when Epsom's industrial area was redeveloped for the Ashley Centre.

Link to our Public Houses page

The first Lord Nelson was a terraced house in Ewell High Street. It was rebuilt more ambitiously in 1905.
The first Lord Nelson was a terraced house in Ewell High Street. It was rebuilt more ambitiously in 1905.
Link to our Public Houses page


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