The Rembrandt Virtual Tour - Twinning


We are grateful to the family of the late Derek Phillips for their permission to use much of the text and images from the website that was set up and run by him. Derek was very interested in local history and his community and a short biography can be viewed on the introductory page.

The came a time in the story of most cinemas in the country in the late 1960's and early 1970's when it became an economic necessity for owners to either sell up, turn the business over to bingo or sub divide to provide more screens. In the case of the Rembrandt, its was decided that Twinning the cinema was the best option, although this was not before permission was granted in 1968 to use the building for Bingo.

Twinning Memo
Twinning Memo<
Image courtesy of the Phillips family © 2007

The cinema closed after the last showing of "Le Mans" in September 1971 and work was carried out for the next ten weeks to convert the rear stalls area into a small 152 seat auditorium whilst the circle was extended to create a 606 seat auditorium.

Plans showing how the small cinema, known as ABC 2, fitted beneath the circle and its 5 new rows.
Plans showing how the small cinema, known as ABC 2,
fitted beneath the circle and its 5 new rows.
Image courtesy of the Phillips family © 2007

The projection box was sited in the old rear stalls entrance and the entrance to the small cinema was formerly one of the pay boxes. The new pay box and kiosk can be seen on the extreme left. An additional exit at the front right of the cinema was never built.

rear wall of the former stalls. The rough brick wall is the wall of the new cinema. pillars supporting the 5 extra rows of the circle, forming ABC 1 cinema.
Inside the void area to the left of ABC 2.
Image courtesy of the Phillips family © 2007

The left hand picture shows the rear wall of the former stalls. The rough brick wall is the wall of the new cinema. The right hand picture show the pillars supporting the 5 extra rows of the circle, forming ABC 1 cinema.

Anecdotal evidence, and the haphazard way the projection was arranged suggests that this was not deemed to be a long term solution. Some have even suggested that it was a bodge! There was certainly room to house three screens so it would appear that these suggestions probably have some truth in them.

The drop wall dividing the circle extension and stalls caused poor acoustics which could have been avoided by boarding over the vacant front stalls ("the pit") or bringing the screen forward, although both these solutions would have been visually intrusive and detracted from the original look of the main auditorium.

An artists impression of what the new ABC 1 auditorium would look like.
An artists impression of what the new ABC 1 auditorium would look like.
Image courtesy of the Phillips family © 2007

A photograph taken 6-10-71 by the council during the conversion works, probably in relation to the new ABC Signs.
A photograph taken 6-10-71 by the council during the
conversion works, probably in relation to the new ABC Signs.
Image Credit: Epsom and Ewell Borough Council

Plans for these were drawn up in 1968 but they were probably fitted when the cinema was twinned. The first proposal was to have them on the left side of the facia.

Drawings for the new ABC Signs
Drawings for the new ABC Signs
Image courtesy of the Phillips family © 2007

Text written by the late Derek Phillips


The Tour


Foyer Projection Suite Box 2 Lighting
Rear Stalls Cafe Documents and Plans
Front Stalls Stage / Backstage Facade
Circle Foyer Roof Managers Office
Circle Boiler House / H&V Plant Twinning
Projection Suite Box 1 Car Park Memories


Link to the Rembrandt History Page


Boring legal stuff relating to this page

As explained earlier the text and images for this page came from the website run by the late Derek Phillips. To preserve his work and allow ready access to it, it was decided to merge his local history pages into the Epsom and Ewell History Explorer website. Of necessity some minor changes to the text were necessary and the layout has been changed to fit in with the house style of Epsom and Ewell History Explorer but in essence the web page is Derek's.

The family of the Late Derek Phillips makes every effort to ensure that the information on this web page is accurate. However, they cannot accept responsibility for any loss or inconvenience caused by reliance on inaccurate material contained in this site. Links to other sites are provided for your convenience, the Phillips family cannot give endorsement of them. They cannot be responsible for any information contained on other websites.

All material on this site (including text and images) is copyright. Every effort is being made to ensure that all sources are credited. Where no credit is given then it should be assumed that the copyright in any particular item resides with the Phillips family or that the Phillips family should be contacted to ascertain who owns the copyright before text or photographs are reproduced elsewhere. Educational use is permitted provided that no changes are made to the material and Derek Phillips is acknowledged as the source.

Commercial usage is prohibited unless formal written permission is obtained beforehand.



 Art
 Family History
 Health
 Map
 Nature
 People
 Places
 Society
 Sources
 Technology
 Trade
 Transport
 War Memorials

 Contact
 Sitemap
 What's New
 Home

Email:


Donate to The History Centre
Derek Phillips
Derek Phillips
Chessington Road
Chessington Rd
Hogsmill River
Hogsmill River
Rembrandt
Rembrandt
Rembrandt Tour
Rembrandt Tour
Ruxley Lane
Ruxley Lane
West Ewell History 1
West Ewell 1
West Ewell History 2
West Ewell 2
West Ewell History 3
West Ewell 3
West Ewell War Memories
West Ewell War