WW2 Book of Remembrance - Surnames D

Index

Click on the name to jump to the relevant entry
[Content]

DANIELL, Michael Charles (Revised 06/07/2018)
DAVIS, Edward Strangways (Revised 08/07/2018)
DAVIS, Ernest Burchett (Revised 06/07/2018)
DAVIS, Ernest John Walter (Revised 06/07/2018)
DAVIS, Herbert George (Revised 06/07/2018)
DAVIS, Victor George * (Revised 14/12/2017)
DAVISON, Norman John (Revised 07/07/2018)
DAY, Alec Ronald (Revised 07/07/2018)
DAY, Ernest (Revised 07/07/2018)
DAY, John Terence Gordon (Revised 09/07/2018)
DE JONGH, Oscar Geoffreij (Revised 11/07/2018)
DEAN, Albert Edward (Revised 11/07/2018)
DENYER, William Arthur John (Revised 09/07/2018)
DENYER, William Charles (Revised 09/07/2018)
DICKINSON, Frederick (Revised 10/07/2018)
DIXON, Reginald John (Revised 15/07/2018)
DONALDSON, Charles Alexander (Revised 10/07/2018)
DORMAN, Kenneth Frederick Edward (Revised 10/07/2018)
DOWLING, Harry Walter (Revised 10/07/2018)
DOWNWARD, Arthur Cyril Reid (Revised 10/07/2018)
DRUMMOND, Clifford John (Revised 12/07/2018)
DUNBAR, James Laird (Revised 12/07/2018)
DUNFORD, Richard Jack (Revised 12/07/2018)
DUNN, Joseph Gordon * (Revised 30/06/2018)
DUTFIELD, Herbert Charles (Revised 12/07/2018)
DWAN, Arthur William * (Revised 12/07/2018)

* = Not included in the Book of Remembrance for reasons unknown.
If you are looking for someone whose name starts with a different letter please try:



Content


DANIELL, Michael Charles. Flight Sergeant (761087)

209 Squadron, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve
Died 22 February 1941, aged 23

Michael was born on 7 April 1917, the second and apparently last child of Charles William Daniell and Mary Winifred (née Brogdale). The parents' Q2 1909 marriage was registered in Mary's home patch of Elham, Kent, but they made their home at 27 High Street, Epsom over the eponymous family newsagents and stationers.

Charles appears to have lived there his whole life. The 1901 Census records him there as a 7 year old schoolboy. The business was run by his 42 year old father, Francis, while his mother, 36 year old Mary Jane, is listed as a school teacher. In early March 1901, Francis died aged 52 and was buried in Epsom Cemetery on 7 March. The 1901 Census, taken on 31 March, records the widowed Mary Jane now running the newsagents, with 17 year old Charles as her assistant. In the 1911 Census, the newly-married 27 year old Charles gets equal billing with his widowed mother as "Newsagent & Stationer Dealer". (No occupation is shown for his wife, Mary Winifred.)

27 High Street
Epsom High Street in about 1912 showing Daniell's Newsagents (arrowed) at No 27.
Postcard from the author's collection.
(At the time of writing in 2018, the premises were occupied by
the British Heart Foundation's charity shop.)

Charles and Mary's first child, Alan was born Q2 1914. Michael arrived three years later and was baptised in Christ Church Epsom Common on 27 May 1917. That was barely a month after Charles had been invalided out of the Royal Artillery, in which he had been Gunner 152632 - circumstances which may have led to his early death in 1924, aged 40. His widow remained at 27 High Street, Epsom - listed there in the 1939 Register as a "Newsagent Stationer".

Michael, the subject of this article, is not found in the 1939 Register - perhaps already being in uniform. In Q2 1940, he (now aged 23) married 26 year old Abina Sarah Kell. The 1939 Register records Abina (an "Insurance Manageress") living with her parents, Thomas (a "Milk Roundsman") and Margaret Kell, at 42 Windermere Avenue, Willesden.

Michael's WW2 service was in 209 Squadron stationed at Oban, on the west coast of Scotland. Their role was to fly maritime reconnaissance patrols over the North Atlantic in the RAF's new Saunders-Roe A.36 Lerwick "flying boats".

One of 209 Squadron's Lerwicks (L7265 - WQ-Q) taking off on 1 March 1941
One of 209 Squadron's Lerwicks (L7265 - WQ-Q) taking off on 1 March 1941
Photograph (CH2363) courtesy of the Imperial War Museum

The hastily-commissioned twin-engined aircraft was found to have many shortcomings - not least its inability to maintain either height or heading if an engine failed. Such a stricken Lerwick could fly only in slowly descending circles. 11 of the 21 Lerwicks were lost or written off during the three years the type saw operational service.

One of those losses was Michael's aircraft L7263 (WQ-L) which, while on patrol in good weather on 22 February 1942 - and possibly for more dramatic reasons than engine failure - went missing with its crew of 14. They are all commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial which records the names of over 20,000 RAF personnel who were lost in WW2 operations and who have no known graves.

No record has been found of Michael and Abina having any children. The widowed Abina seems never to have remarried, dying Q4 1998 in Barnet.

Roger Morgan © 2018

Please contact the Webmaster if you have information or pictures that can extend this entry.

Back to the index


DAVIS, Edward Strangways. Sergeant/Flight Engineer (575812)

467 Squadron (RAAF), Royal Air Force
Died 28 May 1943, aged 20

Not listed in the Book of Remembrance

Edward was born Q4 1922, the first child of John and Muriel Strangways (née Young). The parents' Q4 1921 marriage, Edward's birth and the Q4 1928 birth of the couple's other child, Julie M, were all registered in the Croydon District.

None of these people is readily found in the 1939 Register but, at some point, the parents moved into the Borough. The Commonwealth War Graves Commission's post-war records note that John and Muriel were "of West Ewell, Surrey" - and they are found in the 1945 Electoral Register at 7 Gatley Avenue, West Ewell.

Edward's WW2 service was in 467 Squadron of the Royal Australian Air Force that was formed at RAF Scampton on 7 November 1942. (Although intended as an Australian squadron under Article XV of the Empire Air Training Scheme, the majority of its personnel were originally British. The replacement of these men with Australians was a gradual process and it was only towards the end of the war that the squadron gained a dominant Australian character.)

At 21:59 hours on 27 May 1943, Edward was among the 7-strong crew of Lancaster Mark III ED504 P-OK that took off from RAF Bottesford for a bombing mission over Germany. When the aircraft was near Barlo in north east Germany (about 30 miles north of Essen), it was shot down by night fighter pilot Oberleutnant Manfred Meurer of the Luftwaffe's 3./NJG 1, flying a Messerschmitt Bf 110 G-4 from Venlo airfield (just over the border in the German-held Netherlands). It is reported that the Lancaster "exploded with aerial mine and completely destroyed."

All on board were killed. They were initially buried in the local Barlo Cemetery. In 1947, they were reinterred in the Reichswald Forest War Cemetery - near the Rhine in the extreme north-west of Germany, just south of Arnhem in The Netherlands. The Cemetery was created after WW2 when burials were brought in from all over western Germany. With some 7,600 servicemen buried or commemorated there, it is the largest Commonwealth cemetery in the country.

Edward's family took the option of adding a personal inscription to his headstone on Collective Grave 22.E.9-13,
"We waited long for your return, but you are always with us. Mother, Dad and Julie."
Part of the Reichswald Forest War Cemetery
Part of the Reichswald Forest War Cemetery
Photograph by Wouter van Dijken via findagrave.com

Roger Morgan © 2018

Please contact the Webmaster if you have information or pictures that can extend this entry.

Back to the index


DAVIS, Ernest Burchett.

Civilian
Died 4 October 1940, aged 37

Not listed in the Book of Remembrance

Ernest was born in the Hackney District of London on 9 November 1902. In Q2 1927, he married Ellen L Bassett. The marriage was registered in the Wandsworth District. If they set up home in Ernest's home patch of East London, it is very likely that their two children were Vera E and Jean I Davis whose births in, respectively Q1 1930 and Q2 1934, were registered in the Bethnal Green District.

At some point, the family then moved into the Borough. The 1939 Register (taken on 29 September, a few weeks after war was declared) records them living at 267 Worcester Park Road. 36 year old Ernest is listed as "Motor Driver ARP Stretcher" and Ellen, also aged 36, with the conventional "Unpaid Domestic Duties". The two currently closed records at the address are doubtless their children.

On 4 October 1940, four weeks into the Luftwaffe's "Blitz" bombing offensive, Ernest died as a result of enemy action at Canbury Park Road, Kingston Upon Thames.

Roger Morgan © 2018

Please contact the Webmaster if you have information or pictures that can extend this entry.

Back to the index


DAVIS, Ernest John Walter. Flight Sergeant/Pilot (1254697)

9 Squadron, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve
Died 18 February 1943, aged 24

Ernest's headstone in the Sage War Cemetery, Niedersachsen
Ernest's headstone in the Sage War Cemetery, Niedersachsen
Photograph (18427074) by "dawntree1964" via findagrave.com

Ernest was born on 12 May 1917, the third of four children born to Ernest John Davis and Henrietta Florence (née Reid. The parents' Q2 1912 marriage was registered in the Fulham District, as were the births of their children: Florence in Q1 1913, Alice in Q3 1914, Ernest in 1917 and Patricia on 15 September 1927.

By 1934, the family had arrived locally to live at "Sesame", 92 Bradstock Road, Stoneleigh, and this is where the parents and their two youngest children were recorded in the 1939 Register. In that 49 year old Ernest senior is listed as "Telephonist GPO", 44 year old Henrietta with "House Duties", 22 year old Ernest junior as "Civil Servant Air Ministry" (he had entered the Civil Service as a Clerical Officer on 31 May 1935 by Open Competition) and 12 year old Patricia was at school.

Given his work in the Air Ministry, it is little surprise that Ernest junior's WW2 service was in the RAF. With a Service Number of 1254697, his enlisted was probably at Uxbridge, in or after September 1940. In Q2 1941, the 24 year old Ernest married Eileen Rachel Siddons. The marriage was registered in the Uxbridge District, as was the Q4 1942 birth of their son. (Their address is likely to have been 59 St Mary's Road, Hayes, Middlesex as noted in the October 1943 Probate record of administration of Ernest's £ 98 estate being awarded to his brother in law, William Siddons, a "rounds foreman".

In August 1942, Ernest was among a detachment from No 10 OTU Abingdon sent to RAF St Eval, Cornwall, to join Coastal Command and participate in anti-submarine patrols in the Bay of Biscay. On 22 August, Ernest was the pilot of an Armstrong Whitworth Whitley Mk V, Z6645 - JL-V of 10 OTU which took off from St Eval at 0705. Other members of the crew were:-
Sgt David P. P. Hurst,
Sgt James Vaughan,
Sgt James Storey Aird - navigator,
Sgt. John A. Jones-Ford
Sgt. Thomas Alfred Berwick - gunner.
By about about 15:30, the aircraft's starboard engine started having problems and it failed at 16:00. The plane ditched in the sea at 16:30 and all boarded a life raft. At 13:15 the next day, 23 August, they were rescued by a Spanish fishing boat which landed them in Corunna on 25 August. The crew were interned but, on 20 September 1942, managed to escape - making their way to Gibraltar and then back to the UK.

By early 1943, Ernest had been posted to 9 Squadron and, on 18 February 1943, was among the crew of Lancaster ED492 W-SW which took off from RAF Waddington, Lincolnshire, on a mission to bomb Wilhelmshaven on Germany's North Sea coast. The aircraft was hit by flak from 2 Marine Flak Brigade and, at 20:45, crashed at Schreiersort, about 10 miles north of the target.

Ernest and two others of the crew (Sergeants J W Aird and RW Darlington) were killed in the crash and, on 22 February 1943, were buried in nearby Jever. The others - Sergeants H W Fullard (whose leg had to be amputated), J Vaughan and J A Jones Ford - were taken Prisoners of War.

In July 1947, Ernest and his dead crewmates were reinterred among the 816 Commonwealth WW2 casualties in the Sage War Cemetery, Niedersachsen, near Bremen. The widowed Eileen took the option of adding a personal inscription to his headstone on Grave 8.B.3,
"Beloved husband / of Eileen Rachel / father of Michael Richard / Rest in Peace"
Brian Bouchard © 2017
Updated by Roger Morgan 2018

Please contact the Webmaster if you have information or pictures that can extend this entry.

Back to the index


DAVIS, Herbert George. Fireman and Trimmer

SS Pennington Court (London), Merchant Navy
Died 9 October 1942, aged 33

Not listed in the Book of Remembrance

Apart from the details listed above, the Commonwealth War Graves Commission records note only that Herbert was the "husband of M E Davies, of Epsom, Surrey" - giving none of the usual information about his parents. However, the only "Herbert George Davies" in the records who would have been aged the indicated 33 in October 1942 was born on 23 October 1908 in the New Forest District. He was the second child of Alfred William Davis and Edith (née Holloway - they had married in 1905/6).

The 1911 Census records the family living in Commercial Road, Totton on the outskirts of Southampton. 38 year old Alfred is listed as a "Wood Sawyer". As usual for the time, no occupation is listed for Edith who, in addition 2 year old Herbert George also had 4 year old Thomas William to look after.

At some point, Herbert moved to Epsom. In Q3 1928, he married Mary E Stevens. The marriage was registered in Epsom, as were the births of their three children - Pamela in 1929; George in 1930; and Hetty in 1931. The 1939 Register records the family living at 46 Tonstall Road, Epsom. 30 year old Herbert is listed as "Jointers Mate (Water Works)" and 31 year old Mary the conventional "Unpaid Domestic Duties".

The 1939 Register was taken in late September, so it was after the start of WW2 that Herbert joined the Merchant Navy. He served aboard SS Pennington Court, a 6,100 ton British merchant ship that had been completed in 1924.

SS Pennington Court
SS Pennington Court
Photograph from the City of Vancouver Archives, with thanks
for this - and the incident details - to uboat.net

In October 1942, the Pennington Court was part of Convoy SC-103 which set off from St John, New Brunswick to sail to Belfast. Her cargo was 8,500 tons of grain with trucks as deck cargo. She straggled from the convoy and, between 2100 and 22 hours on 9 October, was struck by torpedoes from U-boat U-254. Some on the Pennington Court were doubtless killed outright - perhaps including Herbert in the boiler room. The rest of the crew abandoned ship and sent distress signals. At 23.10, U-254 fired another torpedo which struck Pennington Court amidships and she then sank by the bow. The U-boat then immediately left without questioning the survivors - it is understood to chase another convoy straggler. Pennington Court's lifeboats were never found and all 45 on board were lost.

Herbert is commemorated on Tower Hill Memorial, one of nearly 24,000 merchant seamen WW2 casualties who have no known grave.

Roger Morgan © 2018

Please contact the Webmaster if you have information or pictures that can extend this entry.

Back to the index


DAVIS, Victor George

Civilian
Died 24 December 1940, aged 29

Not listed in the Book of Remembrance

Victor was born on 31 January 1911, the second child of William Alfred E Davis and Florence Sophia (née Spinks - they had married Q2 1906 in Poplar, London). The 1911 Census records Alfred (a "Commercial Clerk" for a miller) and Florence living in Church Street, Chipping Hill, Witham, Essex, together with their two children: 4 your old Leonard and new-born Victor.

Alfred died in 1928. The 1939 Register records the widowed Florence living at 8 East Holme, Northumberland Heath, Erith, Kent. She is listed with the conventional "Unpaid Domestic Duties". The 28 year old and unmarried Victor is living with her, listed as "Incapacitated - Metallurgist before illness". There is a currently closed record immediately below his, perhaps a younger sibling. The last entry at the address is the 92 year old widow Sarah Spinks, presumably Florence's mother.

At some point, it seems Victor was injured by enemy action - perhaps during the Blitz that had begun in September 1940. He was taken to Horton Emergency Hospital, one of Epsom's cluster of mental hospitals that, during both World Wars, was taken over for military use. He died there on Christmas Eve 1940.

Roger Morgan © 2017

Please contact the Webmaster if you have information or pictures that can extend this entry.

Back to the index


DAVISON, Norman John. Trooper 7892833

4th County of London Yeomanry (Sharpshooters), Royal Armoured Corps
Died 19 November 1941, aged 23

Not listed in the Book of Remembrance

Norman was born Q2 1918, apparently the second child of William Davison and Elizabeth Jane (née Penfold). His birth was registered in the Croydon District, as had been that of his brother Hubert in Q2 1914. The 1939 Register records the 59 year old parents living at 40 Bourdon Road, Penge. William is listed as a "Commercial Traveller" and Elizabeth with the conventional "Unpaid Domestic Duties". Living with them were the 25 year old newlyweds Hubert and Mabel (née Dixon - their Q3 1939 marriage was registered in the Surrey Mid-Eastern District). Hubert (who survived the war) was already in uniform as Driver 76855 in the London Division of the Royal Army Service Corps. The 21 year old Norman is not found in the 1939 Register.

The parents then moved from Penge. The Commonwealth War Graves Commission post-war records note that they parents were "of Ewell, Surrey" - probably at 36 Firswood Avenue, Stoneleigh, which was noted as William's address when he died in Epsom Hospital on 13 January 1951.

Norman served with the 4th County of London Yeomanry (Sharpshooters), Royal Armoured Corps. They were not sent to France as part of the British Expeditionary Force and, after Dunkirk, formed part of Britain's defences against the expected German invasion. While still being equipped, they worked alongside Home Guard units in southern England in early 1941. They embarked for the Middle East in August 1941, arriving in Suez in late September.

There were several ebbs and flows in the WW2 action in North Africa. After Italy declared war on the UK, its forces' initial advance (from the then colony in Libya) towards Egypt in September 1940 was quickly repelled, and the Allies captured the valuable port at Tobruk. Assisted by German forces under General Rommel, the Allies were then mainly driven back, although they retained Tobruk which then came under siege.

Norman's unit was part of Operation Crusader launched on 18 November 1941 with the aim of breaking that siege. This was eventually successful (although Tobruk was then taken again and not recaptured until after the late 1942 turning point of El Alamein), but there were heavy losses. These included Norman, lost in the fierce fighting on the second day of the Operation. He was originally reported as "Missing believed taken prisoner". That was later revised to "Missing believed killed" and, when his body was found, finally confirmed in Casualty List No. 926 as "Killed in action".

He is buried in the Knightsbridge War Cemetery, 10 miles or so outside Tobruk. His parents took the option of adding a personal inscription to his headstone on Grave 4.G.11,
"His heart in England but his valour here."
The Knightsbridge War Cemetery, Libya.
The Knightsbridge War Cemetery, Libya.
Photograph with thanks to the Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Roger Morgan © 2018

Please contact the Webmaster if you have information or pictures that can extend this entry.

Back to the index


DAY, Alec Ronald. Corporal (7882766)

4th/7th Royal Dragoon Guards. Royal Armoured Corps
Died 10 April 1945, aged 31

Alec's headstone in the Rheinberg War Cemetery
Alec's headstone in the Rheinberg War Cemetery
Photograph by Des Philippet, via findagrave.com

Alec was born Q2 1913, the fourth child of wheelwright Frederick Walter Day Evelyn Victoria Maud (née Mutton - they had married Q1 1898 in Milton, Kent). In Q3 1937, Alec married Beatrice Mary James, registered in Wandsworth. The couple set up home in 18 Heatherside Road, West Ewell - which is where the 1939 Register records the 27 year old Beatrice, listed as a shorthand typist at multiple departmental stores. Living with Beatrice were her parents, 76 year old Henry (a retired blindmaker) and 67 year old Edith listed with the conventional "Unpaid Domestic Duties"

The 26 year old Alec was not recorded there, and is likely already to have been serving in the 4th/7th Royal Dragoon Guards in the Royal Armoured Corps. Equipped with Vickers Mk.VI light tanks, they were deployed to France with the British Expeditionary Force performing reconnaissance duties They fought in northern France and Belgium during the Battle of France and, having abandoned their vehicles, were evacuated from Dunkirk landing in England on 3 June 1940.

The regiment later re-equipped with Sherman DD amphibious tanks. These had waterproof float screens which, when raised, enabled the tank to float and be driven through water using their rear propellers. (The DD in the tank's name was the abbreviation for Duplex Drive, but they became known as "Donald Ducks".)

A Sherman DD amphibious tank with its float screen lowered.
A Sherman DD amphibious tank with its float screen lowered.
IWM photograph MH 3660. Public domain.

Good use of these were made of these during the 6 June 1944 D-Day landings. As part of the 8th Armoured Brigade, the regiment landed on King Green, Gold Beach, at 0720 (not even an hour after the first landings at 0630), supporting the 50th (Northumbrian) Infantry Division. It was among the front rank of all the advances eastwards - among other notable achievements, being the first armoured unit to cross the Seine. The regiment later participated in the Battle for the Falaise Gap, and as part of the armoured forces in Operation Market Garden in September 1944 - pushing as far as Driel, on the south bank of the Rhine only a couple of miles from the "bridge too far" at Arnhem.

Allied forces eventually crossed the Rhine in late March 1945 and began advancing to the Elbe. Alec was killed in action on 10 April 1945, less than a month before VE Day on 8 May. He is buried in the Rheinberg War Cemetery, Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany - one of 3,330 Commonwealth WW2 servicemen buried or commemorated there.

The family took the option of adding a personal inscription to his headstone on Grave 12.L.13,
"Always alive in our memory. / Your loving wife, son, / parents and family"
- the son being his only child, Christopher, born Q1 1945, very shortly before Alec's death.

Roger Morgan © 2018

Please contact the Webmaster if you have information or pictures that can extend this entry.

Back to the index


DAY, Ernest. Private (5624530)

1st Battalion Devonshire Regiment
Died 20 November 1943, aged 22

Ernest was born on 27 November 1919, the fourth child of David John Day and Ethel (née Underdown - their Q2 1914 marriage was registered in the Epsom District). David was originally from Hertford and Ethel from Sutton. They seem obviously to have met through their work: the 1911 Census records had married ). The 1911 Census records the 23 year old David as an attendant at Horton asylum and the 20 year old Ethel as laundry maid there.

ERNEST DAY AND HIS SIBLINGS
NameBorn - DiedNotes
Donald AlfredBorn: 26 October 1914Baptised 23 April 1916, St. Barnabas
William JamesBorn: 3 February 1916Baptised 23 April 1916, St. Barnabas
DavidBorn: Q2 1917 Hertford 
ErnestBorn: 27 November 1919 Epsom
Died: 20 November 1943 India
 
Enid MBorn: 25 October 1922 Epsom 
ReginaldBorn: Q2 1924 Epsom 

When Ernest's siblings, Donald and William, were baptised on 23 April 1916, the records noted the family living at 57 Horton Hill, Epsom with their father described as an "orderly".

The electoral registers record Ernest's parents living at "Davenett", Horton Hill from 1935 until 1945, when they were recorded as living at 76 Horton Hill. They were the same address, since the 1939 Register records the address as 76 Horton Hill. In that Register, 50 year old David is listed as a "Mental Nurse" and 47 year old Ethel with the conventional "Unpaid Domestic Duties". Of their children:
  • 24 year old Donald had followed in his father's footsteps and was working as a "Mental Nurse";
  • 23 year old William James was no longer at home;
  • 22 year old David was a "Bread Baker";
  • 19 year old Ernest was a "Factory Colour Grinder";
  • 16 year old Enid was a Leger Clerk; and
  • 15 year old Reginald is presumably behind one of the currently closed records at the address.
Ernest's WW2 service was in the 1st Battalion Devonshire Regiment. This was in India when war broke out and served throughout the war in India, Ceylon and Burma. It is not known when Ernest joined the unit.

Imphal was the capital of Manipur and, in 1943 was the location of British IV Corps which formed part of the newly-created 14th Army. The 1st Devons were in 80th Brigade of the 20th Indian Division, and defended several vital hilltop positions. Ernest was killed on 20 November 1943, before the campaign in Burma came to a crisis in the spring of 1944. By that time the Empire troops facing the Japanese were properly equipped and trained for the job. Commanded by Bill Slim, they destroyed the Japanese offensive at Imphal, and went on to drive them out of Burma completely.

Ernest is buried among in Plot 9.A.4 of the Imphal War Cemetery, India, which holds 1,462 Commonwealth WW2 casualties.

Imphal War Cemetery
Imphal War Cemetery
Photograph by Herojit th - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0

In addition to his entry in the Borough's Book of Remembrance, Ernest is commemorated on the St. Barnabas Roll of Honour.

Clive Gilbert & Hazel Ballan © 2014
Updated by Roger Morgan 2018

Please contact the Webmaster if you have information or pictures that can extend this entry.

Back to the index


DAY, John Terence Gordon. Lieutenant (265919)

1st Battalion, Royal Irish Fusiliers
Died 2 December 1943, aged 20

John's headstone in the Sangro River War Cemetery
John's headstone in the Sangro River War Cemetery.
Photograph (55915283) via findagrave.com, posted there anonymously.

John was born Q1 1923, the son of Richard Day and Agnes (née O'Brien). The birth was registered in Brentford Middlesex, but it is not possible from the readily available records to track down the family background with any confidence. Sadly, both his parents died, and he was taken in by his maternal uncle, Terence O'Brien, and his wife Catherine ("Kitty") Viola (née Peppercorn). They had married Q2 1933, registered in Kensington, and seem to have had no children of their own.

The 1939 Register records the 33 year old Terence (listed as "Surveyor & Estate Agent") living at "White Gables", Longdown Lane South, Epsom Downs. There is one currently closed record at the address - likely to be the 16 year old John. For some reason, Kitty is not recorded there, but her 63 year old widowed mother (of "Independent means") is. The household is supported by a domestic servant.

John's WW2 service was in the 1st Battalion of the Royal Irish Fusiliers. It is not currently clear when he began active service, but this was is likely to have been in time to help driving Axis powers out of Tunisia as a base for the July 1943 invasion of Sicily. The hard-won success there was followed by Allied landings on the Italian mainland. (That invasion coincided with an armistice made with the Italians who then re-entered the war on the Allied side.) During its service in Italy, the battalion took part in many river crossings and battles.

He is buried in the Sangro River War Cemetery, on the Adriatic coast of Italy - one of 2,617 Commonwealth men who died in the fierce fighting on the Adriatic sector of the front in November-December 1943, and during the static period that followed. His uncle and aunt took the option of adding a personal text to his headstone on Grave XIV.C.43,
"Son of the late R and A Day. Dearly loved nephew of Terence & Kitty O'Brien. RIP"
Roger Morgan © 2018

Please contact the Webmaster if you have information or pictures that can extend this entry.

Back to the index


DE JONGH, Oscar Geoffreij. Flying Officer 139692

Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve
Died 22 November 1943, aged 26

Oscar's headstone and Ollerton Cemetery
Oscar's headstone and Ollerton Cemetery
Left: photograph (118795143) by Stephen Farnell via findagrave.com
Right: photograph with thanks to the Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Oscar is not listed in the Book of Remembrance but is remembered here because the Commonwealth War Graves Commission's post-war records note that his widow, Marguerite, was "of Epsom, Surrey", but a local address for her has yet to be established.

From the date on his headstone, Oscar was born on 14 July 1917. He was apparently the first of two children born to Eric de Jongh and Eva (née Sadjian) in Smyrna, Izmir, Turkey. As to the parents and family background, a relative's recollections at Levantine Heritage notes that:
"Eric de Jongh, the son of Oscar John de Jongh, was a charming, outgoing person with a sense of humour and the most popular de Jongh in Smyrna, highly thought of in business … Eric originally married in the 1910s, but divorced before WWII, a lady from Smyrna of Armenian background, Eva Sadjian, a lady of extraordinary beauty, with whom he had two children, [Oscar] Geoffrey and Winifred. Eva accompanied the British Attaché to Greece and his wife in the evacuation of that country in WWII, and would mesmerize onlookers with her sultry dark looks even in early morning rising out of her tent in Crete, on route to Egypt. She later re-married an American diplomat, Arthur Parsons …."
Oscar was an 'Engelandvaarder' - the term applied to men and women who, during World War II, escaped from occupied territory to join Allied forces to continue the fight against Axis countries. He appears to have been a Reserve 2nd Lieutenant in the Dutch Air Force.

In early Q4 1943, the 26 year old Oscar married 23 year old Marguerite Lilian Dart (sometime also known as "Lily May"). The marriage was registered in the Southwell District of Nottinghamshire.

Oscar was with 82 Operational Training Unit based at RAF Ossington, Nottinghamshire. (It may be that Marguerite was a WAAF at the station.) On 22 November 1943, only a few weeks after the wedding, he was the Navigator aboard Wellington Mk X, LN601 - B, which took off at 21:58 from RAF Desborough in Northamptonshire on an operation to drop leaflets in the St Nazaire region of France. Having climbed to about 800 feet, the port engine failed and the aircraft plunged to the ground at Norwell Woods House near Kneeshall Lodge. On impact, there was an explosion and the bomber went up in flames.

All on board were killed, namely:-
WO2 Harold Winthrop Johnson RCAF - Pilot,
F/O Oscar Geoffreij De Jongh RAFVR - Navigator,
P/O Alexander Grant RCAF - Air Bomber,
F/Sgt Kenneth Ross Fallowdown RCAF - Wireless Op / Gunner,
F/Lt John Gordon Brassington RAFVR - Gunner (and the Unit's Gunnery Leader)
Sgt Robert James Wannell RAFVR - Gunner
Together with crewmates WO2 Johnson, P/O Grant and F/Sgt Fallowdown, Oscar is among the 23 WW2 casualties (all airmen) buried in Ollerton Cemetery, Nottinghamshire. His original headstone on Cons. Portion. Grave 1209 was intended to have the personal inscription, "In sweet and tender memory. Loved husband of Marguerite and devoted son of Eric and Eva De-Jongh." The records note that "Headstone is to be replaced by Dutch shape H/S request by OGS agreed by DOG."

Marguerite was pregnant when Oscar died. The birth of their son, Geoffrey David de Jongh, was registered in the Totnes, District in Q3 1944, possibly because she had returned home to her parents for that event. The author of Levantine Heritage noted above records that:
"The child, Geoffrey David de Jongh, grew up to be a charming man who worked for a chemical company in Holland."
Marguerite appears never to have remarried and died on 18 June 1977 at 5 Langridge Road, Paignton.

Brian Bouchard © 2018
Updated by Roger Morgan

Please contact the Webmaster if you have information or pictures that can extend this entry.

Back to the index


DEAN, Albert Edward. Regimental Sergeant Major (Warrant Officer Class I) (394900)

Royal Armoured Corps
Died 1 October 1944, aged 43

Albert's headstone in the Bari War Cemetery
Albert's headstone in the Bari War Cemetery
Photograph (56106987) by Dave Barlow via findagrave.com

Albert is not listed in the Book of Remembrance, but is remembered here because the Commonwealth War Graves Commission's post-war records note that his widow, Florence Ethel Dean, was "of Epsom, Surrey". While that "Epsom" address has yet to be established, the Borough connection is confirmed by finding Florence E Dean in the 1948 electoral roll living at 14 Bourne Way, West Ewell. (As noted below, these electoral roll records are also helpful in understanding the size of Albert and Florence's family.)

Albert's birth was registered in Q1 1901. The 1911 Census records him as the fourth of seven children in the home of 38 year old Edward Dean (a "Horsekeeper, Omnibus") and 37 year old Jane (née Langworth) at 35 Bayham Place, St Pancras, London - the district where all nine of the family had been born.

In Q3 1926 and registered in the Colchester District, Albert married Florence E Ayling. As the 1948 Electoral Roll mentioned above also lists Audrey S Dean at 14 Bourne Way, it seems certain that the child of this name whose birth was registered in the Colchester District Q4 1926 (and whose mother's maiden name was Ayling) was their first child.

It is known from Albert's headstone that they had multiple children. There are five other Dean/Ayling children born before 1945. Given his father's names, it is highly likely that the Albert E Dean whose birth was registered Q4 1928 in Andover was theirs. If so, Barbara E registered in Andover Q1 1928 doubtless was as well. The 1951 electoral roll finds a Daphne Y Dean living at 14 Bourne Way with Florence and Audrey. Daphne's birth was registered in the Eltham District in Q1 1930, so it seems certain that Sonia M Dean whose Q1 1937 birth was also registered in the Eltham District was theirs as well. And Hazel E Dean, whose birth was registered in the Surrey North Eastern District Q1 1940 is also a likely candidate since that could be linked to Albert's 44 Greenway, Merton address noted in the early 1945 Probate records.

The picture would be rather clearer if the family could be found in the September 1939 Register but, perhaps because of transcription errors, that has not yet been possible.

The readily available records are of disappointingly little help in charting Albert's WW2 service in the Royal Armoured Corps. It is known from Casualty List No. 1589 that, at the time of his death on 1 October 1944, he was stationed at a Training depot in southern Italy. Military action by then was well to the north and he died as the result of "accident".

He is buried in the Bari War Cemetery, on the east coast of Italy, near the "heel". His widow took the option of adding a personal inscription to his headstone on Grave VII.E.7, "Sleep, beloved, take thy rest we loved you well but Jesus loves you best. Wife & children"
Roger Morgan © 2018

Please contact the Webmaster if you have information or pictures that can extend this entry.

Back to the index


DENYER, William Arthur John. Private (6018478)

2nd Battalion, Essex Regiment.
Died 10 June 1940, aged 21

William's headstone in the St. Paer Communal Cemetery
William's headstone in the St. Paer Communal Cemetery
Photograph (65870262) by "samayuk" via findagrave.com

William was born Q4 1918 the second (and last) child of William Denyer and Lucy Ann (née Harris - they married Q4 1915, registered in the Epsom District). The 1939 Register records the parents living at 13 West Street, Ewell. William senior (born 15 June 1894) is listed as "Horse Carman Brickyard" and Lucy Ann (born 11 March 1889) as "Charwoman". Living with them is their first child, Lucy M (born 27 August 1916), engaged in "Daily Work".

The 21 year old William junior was doubtless already serving in the 2nd Battalion, Essex Regiment which, as part of the 25th Infantry Brigade, served with the British Expeditionary Force (BEF) in France.

Men of the 2nd Battalion Essex Regiment, Meurchin, France, 27 April 1940
Men of the 2nd Battalion Essex Regiment, Meurchin, France, 27 April 1940
IWM photograph F 4117 Pubic Domain.

The German invasion of Belgium and France was expected but, when this began on 10 May, the Allies were insufficiently prepared for its rapidity. The BEF made a fighting retreat to Dunkirk, from where very substantial numbers were evacuated in the 26 May to 4 June 1940 Operation Dynamo. However, there were many casualties in the fighting along the way. William was reported missing on 18 May and it appears that, like a number of others, he found himself behind German lines and tried to find his way back to the UK. It seems that he had teamed up with the similarly placed Private Albert Leslie Haddon (5885102) of the Northamptonshire Regiment but these two failed. They were both killed on 10 June 1940 - although the report of their deaths was not received until 1942.

William and Albert are buried alongside each other in the St. Paer Communal Cemetery, Seine-Maritime, France - the only Commonwealth WW2 burials there. William's parents took up the option of adding a personal inscription to his headstone,
"Never shall thy memory fade. Sweet thoughts ever linger where thou art laid."
Roger Morgan © 2018

Please contact the Webmaster if you have information or pictures that can extend this entry.

Back to the index


DENYER, William Charles. Trooper (6918688)

18th (5th Battalion The Loyal Regiment) Regiment, Reconnaissance Corps.
Died 29 November 1943, aged 27.

William was born 2 July 1916, at least the fourth child (one of whom one had died) of William Charles Denyer and Alice Mary (née Breeze - they had married Q3 1905, registered in Fulham). The birth was registered in the Wandsworth District, but this covered Streatham where, in the 1911 census, the parents (with William senior as a "Greengrocers Assistant") and two older children were recorded at 77 Hambro Road. That was also where William Senior was "of" when as a WW1 Private (84379) in the Machine Gun Corps, he was killed in France on 28 September 1918.

The 1939 Register records the widowed Alice - with William junior - living with her oldest son Ernest and his wife Florence at 99 Edenfield Gardens, Worcester Park. William's occupation is listed as "Clerk & Librarian Assistance in Chemical Laboratory".

In Q3 1941 and registered in the Wandsworth District, William married Thelma I Donoyou. The couple appear not to have had any children. The Commonwealth War Graves Commission's post-war records note that the widowed Thelma was "of" Danbury, Essex.

William's WW2 service was in the Reconnaissance Corps, and his marriage to Thelma was shortly before his Battalion was, following inspection by King George VI on 22 October 1941, despatched on a roundabout route from the UK to help resist then anticipated Japanese aggression in the Far East. (Japan declared war on both the UK and the USA on 7 December 1941, the date of its surprise attack on Pearl Harbor.)

Their convoy was attacked as they approached Singapore in early February 1942. Survivors, including William, joined in the effort to resist the Japanese advance but without success. Singapore was surrendered to the Japanese Army on 15 February and William was one of the many taken prisoner of war. It seems likely that he was initially in the PoW camp at Changi and then taken to work on the infamous Bangkok-Rangoon "Death Railway". Unlike many others, he survived past its mid-1943 completion, after which surviving PoWs were put to work in labour camps.

Conditions for these POWs were - as on the "Deat Railway" - extremely harsh and William died on 29 November 1943. As he has no known grave, he is one of more than 24,000 Commonwealth casualties commemorated on the Singapore Memorial in Kranji War Cemetery, Singapore.

The Singapore Memorial (rear) in the Kranji War Cemetery
The Singapore Memorial (rear) in the Kranji War Cemetery
Picture with thanks to the Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Roger Morgan © 2018

Please contact the Webmaster if you have information or pictures that can extend this entry.

Back to the index


DICKINSON, Frederick. Gunner (802594)

124 Field Regiment, Royal Artillery
Died 25 March 1944, aged 34

Not listed in the Book of Remembrance

Frederick was born Q1 1910 in Egremont, Cumberland (part of modern-day Cumbria), the second child of Isaac and Esther Jane Dickinson. The 1911 Census records the family of four living at 5 Cross Keys Lane, Egremont. 22 year old Isaac (six years younger than his wife) is listed as a labourer below ground in one of the mines in the West Cumberland Iron Field.

In Q2 1935, Frederick married Margaret ("Peg") Bacon. The marriage was registered in Northumberland - as were the births of their children: Margaret (Q4 1935); and Frederick (Q2 1939). The family is not readily found in the 1939 Register. The Commonwealth War Graves Commission's post-war records state that the widowed Margaret was "of West Ewell, Surrey", and it seems likely that she was the Margaret Dickinson recorded in the 1945 Electoral Register living at 35 Green Lanes, West Ewell.

The readily available records provide few details of Frederick's WW2 service in the Royal Artillery. It would seem that he first saw action in the Middle East, where Casualty List No. 952 of 12 October 1942 reports him as being taken Prisoner of War. According to a 1943 record, he was held in P.O.W. Camp number 51, Villa Sereni at Bari in SE Italy. The next record is in Casualty List No. 1852 which records him being killed in action on 25 March 1944.

So, it seems likely that, following the early September 1943 armistice with the Italians and the Allied invasion of German-held mainland Italy, Frederick was liberated from Bari - and then rejoined his unit as the Allies moved northwards through Italy. There was, all the way, stiff opposition from the occupying German forces, most notably in late 1943 and early 1944 on the German defensive position across central Italy known as the Gustav Line. After several failed attempts, the Allies finally broke though at Monte Cassino, and it would appear that Frederick was killed in the early stages of this finally successful action.

Frederick is one of the 488 Commonwealth WW2 casualties buried in the Padua War Cemetery, situated about 10 miles west of Venice. His widow took the option of adding a personal inscription to his headstone on Grave I.E.9,
"Tender thoughts, love and kindness. Ever remembered. Peg, Margaret, Freddy."
The Padua War Cemetery
The Padua War Cemetery
Picture with thanks to the Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Roger Morgan © 2018

Please contact the Webmaster if you have information or pictures that can extend this entry.

Back to the index


DIXON, Reginald John. Corporal (5624338)

2/7th Battalion, The Queen's Royal Regiment (West Surrey)
Died 20 September 1944, age 24

Not listed in the Book of Remembrance

Reginald was born on 8 November 1919, apparently the only child of Thomas John Dixon and Amy (née Muggeridge). Both their marriage and his birth were registered in the Epsom District.

In Q2 1939 (and registered in the successor Surrey Mid Eastern District), Reginald married Amy Sophia Egglesden. The 1939 Register records the newlyweds living with Reginald's parents in Flat 9b The Parade, Banstead. The 48 year old Thomas is listed as a "Builders' Scaffolder" and 19 year old Reginald as a "Garage Attendant". The 44 year old Amy is listed with the conventional "Unpaid Domestic Duties" - as is her new 21 year old daughter in law - another Amy.

There is no record of Reginald and Amy having any children. The Commonwealth War Graves Commission's post war records note the widowed Amy as being "of Ewell, Surrey", and she is recorded in the 1946 Electoral Roll living at "The Cottage" on the now lost Cherry Orchard Farm, London Road, Ewell.

The readily available records provide few details of Reginald's WW2 service in the 2/7th Battalion, The Queen's Royal Regiment (West Surrey). This may have begun in time for him to have been sent to France in 1940 as part of the British Expeditionary Force. The Battalion was still less than fully trained and, when the unexpectedly ferocious German invasion came, suffered heavy casualties during the fighting retreat to Dunkirk. The Battalion then saw action with the Eighth Army in the Western Desert Campaign against Axis powers in North Africa.

Success there provided the springboard for the Allied Invasion of Italy. The Battalion landed at Salerno in September 1943, in the immediate aftermath of which Reginald was wounded on 19 September (Casualty List No. 1264). They then took part in some of the fiercest fighting of the Italian Campaign as the German forces (the Italians by then had re-entered the war on the Allied side) retreated northwards to well-prepared defensive lines. It is not clear how long Reginald took to recover from his wounds, but he was back in action for the September 1944 breaking of the German's heavily defended "Gothic Line" and was killed in action on 20 December, the day before Rimini was captured.

Reginald is buried in Grave II.D.20 of the Gradara War Cemetery (on Italy's east cost, about level with Florence on the west), one of the 1,191 Commonwealth WW2 burials there.

The Gradara War Cemetery
The Gradara War Cemetery
Picture with thanks to the Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Roger Morgan © 2018

Please contact the Webmaster if you have information or pictures that can extend this entry.

Back to the index


DONALDSON, Charles Alexander. Lance Corporal (6141079)

2nd Battalion, East Surrey Regiment
Died 24 February 1945, aged 27

Charles was born in Newcastle on 30 March 1917, the son of Alex and Martha Donaldson. Details of the family background have, so far, proved resistant to a range of routinely available searches. Some available Forces records show Charles's pre-service residence to have been in Cumberland (now part of Cumbria) and that he worked as a stableman.

At some point, the parents moved to Epsom. It may be that this was early enough for young Charles to have come with them, at least for a time: it is certainly interesting that, when he enlisted, it was into the East Surrey Regiment. Anyway, the parents are found in the September 1939 Register living at 25 Beech Road, Epsom. Alexander (born 24 April 1885) is listed as a "General Labourer" and Martha (born 21 July 1889) with the conventional "Unpaid Domestic Duties". Living with them was the 24 year old C Crumlish, an apparently unrelated "General Labourer". (There is also one currently closed record at the address but, as that is listed below Crumlish, it shouldn't be a member of the Donaldsons' family.)

Charles is not found in the 1939 Register, and seems likely that he was already in uniform. At the September 1939 outbreak of WW2 in Europe, the East Surrey Regiment's 2nd Battalion was stationed in Shanghai - presumably guarding the then British Concession there which, although Japan had been at war with China since 1937 (and with skirmishing since 1931), the Japanese had so far respected. In August 1940, the Battalion was moved to Malaya. After an initial period on Singapore Island, it was moved north, almost to the border with Siam (now Thailand) to join other troops. In June 1941, work began on a defensive line to run east and west, north of Jitra, designed to protect the Alor Star airfield.

On 7 December 1941, Japanese forces launched surprise attacks on not only Pearl Harbor but also Manila, Shanghai and Hong Kong. They also landed in Southern Thailand and at Badang on the north east coast of Malaya. In very heavy rain, work was redoubled on completing the so-called "Jitra Line" but it was still incomplete when, on the evening of 10 December, Japanese forces attacked across the northern border of Malaya. Supported by tanks, they quickly overran the forward Allied troops. A night withdrawal to a reserve line was ordered, but the enemy had now blocked the main road bridge to the south, causing many wheeled and tracked vehicles to be abandoned.

Heavy Allied losses were incurred in seeking to impede the Japanese advance southwards but to no avail. The strategically important island of Singapore - and the surviving Allied troops, including Charles, now concentrated there - were surrendered to the Japanese on 15 February 1942.

British Commanders on their way to surrender Singapore, 15 February 1942
British Commanders on their way to surrender Singapore, 15 February 1942
IWM photograph HU 2781 Pubic Domain.

It is not clear whether, like many PoWs, Charles was put to work on the infamous "Death Railway". However, some months before its completion, he was transferred on 1 April 1943 to the Malai 1 PoW camp on Borneo. Conditions in Japanese PoW camps were extremely harsh, and Charles died on 24 February 25.

He has no known grave and, as one of the more than 24,000 such casualties of the land and air forces of the Commonwealth who died during the campaigns in Malaya and Indonesia, is commemorated on the Singapore Memorial in Kranji War Cemetery, Singapore.

The Singapore Memorial (rear) in the Kranji War Cemetery
The Singapore Memorial (rear) in the Kranji War Cemetery
Picture with thanks to the Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Roger Morgan © 2018

Please contact the Webmaster if you have information or pictures that can extend this entry.

Back to the index


DORMAN, Kenneth Frederick Edward. Lieutenant (A)

HMS Victorious, Fleet Air Arm, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve.
Died 19 December 1944, aged 23

Kenneth Dorman taken 4 January 1943
Kenneth Dorman taken 4 January 1943 on board HMS Formidable.
Image Source : IWM (A 14202)

Kenneth's birth was registered in Ashby de la Zouch, Leicestershire in Q2 1921. He was the second and apparently last child of Edward Joseph Dorman and Daisy Louise (née Cook - they had married in the Hackney District in Q3 1915). Their first child, Joan, was born in Norwich on 17 February 1918.

Daisy died aged only 38, registered in the Donaster District, Q4 1923. In Q3 1932 and registered in Lichfield, the widowed Edward got married again - to Ellen Hughes. By 1936, the Dorman family had arrived in Surrey, residing at 'Lucerne', 136 Reigate Road, Ewell. They are recorded there in the September 1939 Register. 52 year old Edward is listed as an "Insurance Director" (understood to be of the Liverpool Victoria Friendly Society); 40 year old Ellen with the conventional "Unpaid Domestic Duties"; and 21 year old daughter Joan as a "Library assistant". There are two currently closed records at the address. One seems certain to be the 18 year old Kenneth. As to the other, it is not possible from the readily available records to establish whether Kenneth and Ellen had a child together, or whether, if was also a widow when they married, she brought a child with her.

Kenneth's WW2 service was in the Fleet Air Arm. He learned to fly at No. 31 Service Flying Training School in the small town of Gananoque, 18 miles east of the city of Kingston, Ontario - which became the home of the first RAF pilot training school which moved to Canada out of England. "K F E Dorman from Ewell, Surrey", was among the forty-seven graduates of No. 10 Course in the Canadian Fleet Air Arm training school who received their wings in June 1941.

Subsequently, Kenneth served as a pilot in 818 and 820 Squadrons and, by 4 January 1943, he was aboard the aircraft carrier HMS Formidable. By late 1944, he was in the Far East aboard the carrier HMS Victorious.

HMS Victorious shortly after arriving at Ford Island, Pearl Harbour, in March 1943.
HMS Victorious shortly after arriving at Ford Island, Pearl Harbour, in March 1943.
Image source: www.armouredcarriers.com

On 19 November 1944, HMS Victorious left Trincomalee to carry out gunnery exercises and to embark 21 Grumman Avengers of 849 Squadron. The ship went to "flying stations" just after 2pm with Kenneth as the Deck Landing Control Officer. Ten of the new aircraft landed safely but, at 2.50 pm, the eleventh suddenly swerved to port in the seconds before landing. As the aircraft ditched over the side, it hit and killed Kenneth who then fell into the sea. While the injured aircrew of the Avenger (Sub Lt. G R Winch, and Sub Lt. C R Tipler) were recovered from the water by HMS Rapid, Kenneth could not be found.

A later crashed Grumman Avenger.
A later crashed Grumman Avenger.
Image source: Wikimedia.org

He is commemorated on the Lee-On-Solent Memorial, Hampshire - near the Fleet Air Arm's principal base - as one of the almost 2,000 men of that service who died during WW2 and who have no known grave.

The June 1945 Probate record of administration of Kenneth's £ 382 estate being granted to his father (now "Chairman, Friendly Society" - and who survived until 1966) confirmed his address as 136 Reigate Road, Ewell.

Brian Bouchard © 2017
Updated by Roger Morgan 2018

Please contact the Webmaster if you have information or pictures that can extend this entry.

Back to the index


DOWLING, Harry Walter. Gunner (1476386)

226 Battery, 57 (1/5th The East Surrey Regiment) Anti-Tank Regiment, Royal Artillery
Died 25 May 1940, aged 25

Harry was born Q3 1914, the first child of Henry Victor Dowling and Laura Sophia (née Mcleod or, in some records, MacLeod). The parents had married Q4 1912 in the Chelmsford District. Neither was originally from Essex. Henry had been born (in 1887) in Westcott, Surrey, and, in the 1901 census, is found as a 13 year old "Farm Boy", living at 4 The Flats, High Road, Ashtead. Laura was born (in 1886) in Peckham and, in 1911, was a 15 year old "Housemaid Domestic, living at 8 North Street, Bromley. Neither has been found in the 1911 Census.

The couple made their first home in Essex. Harry's 1914 birth was registered in the Ongar District, as was the Q4 1916 birth of the couple's second and last child, Allan S V Dowling.

By the mid 1930s, the family had moved to Epsom, living at 281 Hook Road. This is where the parents were recorded in the September 1939 Register. 52 year old Henry is listed as a "Milk Roundsman" and 53 year old Laura with the conventional "Unpaid Domestic Duties". Their names are followed by a currently closed record - perhaps covering 22/23 year old Allan, since the next entry is for 21 year old Daisy Tulip Nobes who, a few weeks later was to marry him (registered Q4 1939 in the local Surrey Mid Eastern District).

Young Harry, the subject of this article, had been an employee of Epsom and Ewell Council and it seems likely that he was a part time soldier in the Territorial Army. He was not at home for the 1939 Register since he had attested for the Royal Artillery in 1938. His WW2 service was with the Royal Artillery's 226th Battery, 57th Anti-Tank Regiment. This unit was formed in 1938 when the Territorial unit, the 1/5th Battalion East Surrey Regiment was converted to artillery to become the 57th (East Surrey) Anti-Tank Regiment, RA. This was part of the 44th (Home Counties) Infantry Division that was sent to France in the III Corps British Expeditionary Force (BEF), during 1940.

Although the German invasion of Belgium and France had been expected, it was of unanticipated speed and ferocity when it came. The BEF made a fighting retreat to Dunkirk for evacuation from 26 May to 4 June 1940. That retreat was covered by heavy fighting in a series of delaying actions. Harry's unit was involved in one such action at St Venant. (Indeed, British troops continued fighting at St. Venant after the evacuation of Dunkirk, and 90 or more were buried in a mass grave there.) Harry was initially reported missing in the action, but was later confirmed to have been killed on 25 May 1940.

Harry is one of 177 Commonwealth WW2 casualties (which includes the 90 re-interred from the mass grave) buried in the St. Venant Communal Cemetery - which also holds 253 burials from WW1. His parents took the option of adding a personal inscription to his headstone on Grave 4.C.33,
"Gone from us but not forgotten."
The Epsom Herald dated 20 June 1940 printed the following:
"DOWLING. In loving memory of our eldest son Harry, killed in action in his 26th year. Mum, Dad and Allan. Always remembered."
In addition to his entry in the Borough's Book of Remembrance, Harry is commemorated on the Town Hall's plaque of Council employee WW2 casualties and on the St. Barnabas Roll of Honour.

Part of the St. Venant Communal Cemetery
Part of the St. Venant Communal Cemetery.
Photograph with thanks to inmemories.com

Clive Gilbert & Hazel Ballan 2014
Updated by Roger Morgan 2018

Please contact the Webmaster if you have information or pictures that can extend this entry.

Back to the index


DOWNWARD, Arthur Cyril Reid. Pilot Officer (105178)

103 Squadron, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve.
Died 23 June 1942, aged 30

Arthur was born on 24 October 1911, the first child of Arthur Edward Downward and Lucy Mabel (née Reid - their Q2 1911 marriage was registered in the Lambeth District. Arthur junior was baptised at St Andrew's Church, Carshalton on 25 November 1911 when the family were living locally, at "Ellesmere", Carshalton Hill (?). The birth of the couple's second and last child, Margaret, on 4 August 1914 was registered in the Wandsworth District.

At some point, the family settled at "The Denstone" (probably the No 16 of post-war records), Melrose Road, Coulsdon. In the September 1939 Register, however, family members were somewhat scattered. The three entries at the family home are 50 year old mother Lucy, 25 year old daughter Margaret and her 27 year old husband Norman Tubbs. (Those two were very newly wed: their marriage was registered in the Wandsworth District Q3 1939.) Norman is listed as "Superintendent of Factory Biscuit Manufacturer" and the two women with the conventional "Unpaid Domestic Duties".

Meanwhile, 58 year old father Arthur was registered staying with the apparently unrelated Walter and Violet Crabb in 2 Rose Cottages, Uckfield. His occupation is listed as "Insurance Official" so he was perhaps away from home on business.

As to the 27 year old Arthur junior, he was registered staying with the apparently unrelated William and Gertrude Bowen at 38 The Mall, Swindon, and listed as a "Bank Clerk". As will be seen, it is significant that registered staying with "Bank Manager" Edward Cleasby and his family at 3 High Street, Swindon, was the 30 year old Norah Sells - like Arthur, a "Bank Clerk".

Norah's family home was "North View", Seymour Avenue, Ewell (residents of which, at the time of the 1939 Register, were Norah's 58 year old widowed mother, Elizabeth, and Norah's two siblings - also bank employees). It was apparently from "North View" that Norah married Arthur in Q3 1940. The marriage was registered in the local Surrey Mid Eastern District, as was the birth of their only child, Michael, in Q2 1941.

Arthur's WW2 service was in the RAF, his Service Number 1164827 indicating that he enlisted at Cardington in or after April 1940. He was commissioned as a Pilot Officer during 1941 and posted to 103 Squadron, part of Bomber Command.

On 22 June 1942, Arthur was the Observer aboard Wellington DV818 of 103 Squadron which took off at 23.08 hours from RAF Elsham Wolds, Lincolnshire on a mission to bomb Emden. The crew were:-
W/C O Godfrey, DFC, - Pilot,
Sgt V J Gallogly, RAAF, - Co-pilot,
P/O A C R Downward - Observer,
F/Sgt H G Edwards - W Op/Bomb aimer,
Sgt J W Porteous - W Op/AG
Sgt F E Barnett - Air Gunner.
At 01.12 hours on 23 June, their aircraft went down into the North Sea, north-west of Terschelling, the Netherlands - reportedly shot down by NF Hptm. H. Lent of II/NJG 2.

All but Sergeant F E Barnett (who became a POW) were killed. The bodies of 26 year old Wing Commander Oliver Godfrey and 19 year old Sergeant Porteous were recovered (for burial in, respectively, Wierhuizen Protestant Cemetery, Groningen in The Netherlands and the Sage Cemetery, Oldenburg in Germany). Arthur Sergeant Vincent John Gallogly and Flight Sergeant H G Edwards are commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial, Surrey, which commemorates more than 20,000 airmen and women who were lost in WW2 operations from bases in the United Kingdom and North and Western Europe, and who have no known grave.

The RAF's Runneymede Memorial
The RAF's Runneymede Memorial
Photograph with thanks to the Commonwealth War Graves Commission

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission's post-war records note that the widowed Norah was "of Ewell, Surrey" - presumably of the family's "North View", Seymour Avenue address. However, when she was awarded administration of Arthur's £ 583 estate in April 1943, the Probate records give Arthur's address as his family's 16 Melrose Road, Coulsdon.

Brian Bouchard © 2017
Updated by Roger Morgan 2018

Please contact the Webmaster if you have information or pictures that can extend this entry.

Back to the index


DRUMMOND, Clifford John. Lieutenant (73421)

Hampshire Regiment (attached to 1st Battalion, 10th Baluch Regiment)
Died 21 July 1943, aged 23

Not listed in the Book of Remembrance

Clifford was born Q2 1920, apparently the only child of David Drummond and Elizabeth (née Davis). His birth was registered in the West Ham District. The 1939 Register records the parents living at 9 Bentley Drive, Ilford, Essex. 54 year old David worked for the Post Office in overseas telegraphs and 47 year old Elizabeth is listed with the conventional "Unpaid Domestic Duties". There is one currently closed record at the address, likely to be of the 19 year old Clifford.

In Q4 1941 Clifford married Joan Mary Wood. The marriage was registered in Ilford. The Commonwealth War Graves Commission's post-war records note that the widowed Joan was "of Epsom, Surrey". That Epsom address has yet to be established - but the 1952 Electoral Roll records her living in the Borough, at 55 Ewell Bypass. (The 1948 Roll lists her living at 158 Winkworth Road, Banstead.)

Although Clifford's WW2 service was formally with the Hampshire Regiment, he was attached to the 1st Battalion of the Indian Army's 10th Baluch Regiment. This was stationed in Iraq as part of the Persia and Iraq Command with the primary duty of safeguarding the oilfields and installations in the area.

Casualty List No. 1197 noted that Clifford "died" on 21 July 1943 - the implication being that this was of illness rather than action. (Indeed, most of the forces' deaths in the area were the result of illness or accident.) Clifford is one of 145 Commonwealth WW2 burials in the Mosul War Cemetery, sited about a mile outside that city and which also holds 191 WW1 casualties. His widow took the option of adding a personal inscription to his headstone on Grave 1.C.2,
"Earth's loss is heaven's gain; in God's own time we meet again. Joan."

Sadly, the Cemetery was among the many memorials and monuments wrecked by ISIS jihadists during their occupancy of Mosul from 2014-17.

Roger Morgan © 2018

Please contact the Webmaster if you have information or pictures that can extend this entry.

Back to the index


DUNBAR, James Laird. Sergeant (1585541)

514 Squadron, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve
Died 22 May 1944, aged 21

James's headstone in Cambridge City Cemetery
James's headstone in Cambridge City Cemetery
Photograph (32378785) by "julia&keld" via findagrave.com

Not listed in the Book of Remembrance

James's birth was registered Q4 1922, as the second child of James Dunbar and Fanny Miriam (née Dockree). The parents' marriage was registered at Woolwich in Q3 1919. James's birth (and that of his older sister, Mary M in Q2 1921) was registered in the Pancras District of London. The family then moved to Beckenham where the births of their third and fourth children were registered - Muriel J in Q1 1928 and Shelia I in Q3 1929.

The September 1939 Register records the parents living at 134 Ravenscroft Road, Beckenham. 58b year old James senior is listed as a "Timekeeper, Tobacco Factory" and 46 year old (Fanny) Miriam with the conventional "Unpaid Domestic Duties". Also registered there were two of their daughters 18 year old Mary (a "Typist") and 11 year old school girl Muriel. There are also two currently closed records at the address- presumably covering their other two children, including the 17 year old James junior.

James enlisted with the Royal Air Force at Weston Super Mare during September 1941. In Q3 1943, now aged 21, he married 23 year old Eirene Margaret Dodridge. The marriage was registered in the Croydon District, consistent with her late 40s parents ("Bank Clerk" William and Jessie) being found in the 1939 Register living at 170 South Norwood Hill, Croydon. They subsequently moved into the Borough, living at 62 Ruxley Lane, Ewell - and this is the "of West Ewell, Surrey" address in the Commonwealth War Graves Commission's post-war records for the widowed Eirene.

James's WW2 service was in the RAF's Bomber Command - by early 1944 in 514 Squadron based at RAF Waterbeach, about 6 miles north of Cambridge. On 21 May 1944, he was Bomb Aimer among the 7 man crew of Lancaster DS633 JI-B, one of 23 aircraft from the Squadron that took off for a large raid on Duisburg.

Theirs was one of the three Lancasters were lost in the operation. The circumstances were never clearly established but the Squadron's Operations Record Book notes a belief that the aircraft crashed in The Wash. A fix had been obtained by RAF Waterbeach at 03.03 hours and the crew was ordered to jettison its bombs. The aircraft was possibly shot down by the Me410 of Fw. Johann Trenke, who claimed three aircraft over Northern Norfolk between 03.05 and 03.22 hours.

The crew of DS633 JI-B were:-
F/S T L Gibson (Pilot)
Sgt A H Freeburn (Navigator)
Sgt J L Dunbar (Bomb Aimer)
Sgt L Buxton (WOP/Air)
Sgt G H Kemp (MU Gunner)
Sgt J Gallagher (Rear Gunner)
Sgt J Fraser (Flight Engineer).
All members of its crew were killed in the crash, but their bodies were recovered.

James is one of 829 WW2 casualties - mainly airmen from the nearby RAF bases - buried in the Cambridge City Cemetery (known locally as Newmarket Road Cemetery). The widowed Eirene took the option of adding a personal inscription to his headstone on Grave 13566,
"Jimmy. A treasured memory. To live in hearts we leave behind is not to die."
Eirene continued living with her parents until, in Q3 1948 (and registered the local Surrey Mid Eastern District), she contracted a second marriage - to Paul R W Hamblin. There is no record of Eirene and James having any children. She and Paul had two - Janet in Q3 1949 and Geoffrey in Q3 1950 - both registered in the Bromley District. Eirene Margaret Hamblin died in East Sussex during 2007.

Brian Bouchard © 2018
Updated by Roger Morgan

Please contact the Webmaster if you have information or pictures that can extend this entry.

Back to the index


DUNFORD, Richard Jack. Flying Officer/Pilot (124945)

Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve
Died 7 April 1943, aged 24

Richard's headstone in the Rosskeen Parish Churchyard Extensions
Richard's headstone in the Rosskeen Parish Churchyard Extensions
Photograph (69796856) by "BobBoston" via findagrave.com

Richard was born in Epsom on 5 April 1919, the fourth of six children born to James Thomas Dunford and Annie (née Tucker). The parents had married in Epsom Q2 1908 and the 1911 census records these 29 year olds (with James listed as a Gas Fitter in the Gas Works) living at 21 Adelphi Road, Epsom with their first two children, 1 year old Eva and new-born Eric. Their third child, Rona J was born Q3 1917. After Richard's 1919 birth, the last two children were Raymond G (Q2 1923) and Vanda L (Q1 1925).

Richard's secondary education was at Sutton County School, from which he went up to King's College, London, during 1937. By that date, the family were living at 27 Hook Road, Epsom (subsequently demolished and now the St John Ambulance Brigade Depot). The parents and four of their children were recorded at that address in the September 1939 Register: James was still employed at the Gas Works, now as a "Lorry Driver".

Richard, however, had left University in 1939 to enlist with the Royal Artillery - but later transferred to the Royal Air Force with a service number 657898. On 24 June 1942, from Flight Sergeant, he became a Pilot Officer (Emergency) and was appointed Flying Officer on probation (War substitute), 26 December 1942.

On 7 April 1943, Richard and two others drowned when a Sunderland II, W6001, of 4 (Coastal) Operational Training Unit broke her moorings at 05:25 in a gale at Alness and sank. He had been acting as one of the three 'plane guards' - in command of LAC Francis William Dummigan - 1501094 aged 20 & W/O Leslie D. Jones - 580204 aged 30.
"APRIL 7th. - CROMARTY. At 6.35 in the morning a message came from the RAF that several of their seaplanes had broken adrift from their moorings, with their crews aboard, that they had not enough boats to face the storm, and that they would be glad of the life-boat's immediate help. A strong N.W. gale was blowing, with a rough sea, and there were heavy showers of sleet. The motor life-boat James Macfee was launched at 7.15, went to the seaplane base, took two RAF officers on board, and then patrolled round the seaplanes and gave them valuable help. They were all made safe except one, which had foundered. The life-boat searched the firth for her crew of six men, but they had all been drowned."

[In fact a second aircraft had been lost, a Catalina AH568, killing watch crew, Sgt N K Carew and Sgt E Havron who would have been included in the suggested total.]
 The Short Sunderland Flying Boat
The Short Sunderland Flying Boat
Image Courtesy Wikimedia Commons

Richard's date of death is also found recorded as 20 May 1943, apparently because his body was then washed ashore. He is buried in the Rosskeen Parish Churchyard Extensions which are close to the north shore of Cromarty Firth, between Invergordon and Alness, Ross and Cromarty, Scotland. These hold 75 WW2 service casualties and 61 from WW1. His family took the option of adding a personal inscription to his headstone on Grave B.337,
"Threads beyond price in the tapestry of England."
Administration of Richard's £ 284 estate was granted to his mother, Annie - the record of which confirmed his home address as 27 Hook Road, Epsom.

In addition to his entry in the Borough's Book of Remembrance, Richard is commemorated on the WW2 memorials of: St Martin's Church, Epsom; Sutton Grammar School; and the Chapel of King' s College, London.

Brian Bouchard © 2017
Updated by Roger Morgan 2018

Please contact the Webmaster if you have information or pictures that can extend this entry.

Back to the index


DUNN Joseph Gordon. Constable

Metropolitan Police
Died 29 June 1944, aged 41

Not listed in the Book of Remembrance

Joseph was born in Devonport on 15 September 1902, the third (but second surviving) child of James William Dunn and Jessie Florence Maria (née Bath - they had married in Jessie's home patch of Compton Martin, Somerset in 1899). The couple's second child, Florence Lilian, was born and died Q4 1901 in the Devonport District.

The record of Joseph's baptism at St Mark's Church, Ford on 30 September 1902 noted that the family's home was 10 Vanguard Terrace in the Ford area of Devonport, and that his father was an "Engine Driver". By the time of the 1911 Census (in which both 34 year old parents use only their second names, William - now listed as a "Steam Motor Wagon Driver, Brewery" - and Florence) records them living at 56 Exe Street, Exeter. Their now three sons - also called only by their second names - were "(James) William" 10, "(Joseph) Gordon" 8 and "Godfrey" 6. There is also a 1911 record of Joseph's admission to the St David's Church of England First School, Exeter.

Joseph's next appearance in the readily available records is on 30 April 1932 when, in St John's Church, Belmont, this now 29 year old married 24 year old Dorothy Cunningham Turner. At the time of their marriage, Joseph was living at 10 Cressingham Grove, Sutton and was a police constable. (Both their marriage and the Q4 1932 birth of what appears to be their only child, John, were registered in the Epsom District which, at the time, included Banstead and Sutton.)

The 1939 Register records Joseph (as a Metropolitan Police Constable) living at 1 Oxford Close, Mitcham. Neither his wife nor child was there - although the address is where the Commonwealth War Graves Commission's post-war records list the widowed Dorothy as being "of". It appears that they may have been evacuated to Workingham in Cumberland where they were staying with the Bell family. (The only other occupant of 1 Oxford Close in 1939 Register was the 20 year old unmarried "Pay Clerk" David Bennett.)

On 22 June 1944, Joseph (who is understood to have been off duty) was injured by enemy action at the junction of Manor Way and Rowan Road, Mitcham - about three quarters of a mile from his home in Oxford Close. He was taken to Horton Emergency Hospital (one of Epsom's cluster of mental hospitals that, during both World Wars, was taken over for military use) and died there on 29 June 1944.

Roger Morgan © 2018
With special thanks to Hazel Ballan

Please contact the Webmaster if you have information or pictures that can extend this entry.

Back to the index


DUTFIELD, Herbert Charles. Flying Officer/Air Bomber (154376)

186 Squadron, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve
Died 16 January 1945, aged 23

Herbert's headstone and the Haverhill Cemetery
Herbert's headstone and the Haverhill Cemetery
Left: Photograph (54146956) by "julia&keld" via findagrave.com
Right: Photograph with thanks to the Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Herbert was the third of four children born to Frederick W T Dutfield and Harriet (née Gibbons). The parents' Q3 1916 marriage was registered in the Uxbridge District - as were the birtths of all their children: Frederick W T in Q3 1916; Gladys F in Q4 1917; Herbert Charles in Q2 1921; and Ivy D in Q1 1923.

The September 1939 Register records the parents living at 115 Abbotts Road, Southall. 54 year old Frederick is listed as a "Syphon Man, Gas Works" and 48 year old Harriett with the conventional "Unpaid Domestic Duties". 23 year old Frederick junior was still at home and is listed as s "Butcher (Manager)". There are also two currently closed records at the address, one of which may well be covering the 18 year old Charles.

Charles's original Service Number of 1324220 suggests that he enlisted with the RAF in or after November 1940. He advanced from LAC to commission as a Pilot officer on 26 November 1943 before promotion to Flying Officer, 26 May 1944, serving in 186 Squadron of the RAF's Bomber Command.

Shortly before that promotion, Herbert married Patricia R McGrath. This was registered in the local Surrey Mid Eastern District Q1 1944. It is understood that Patricia was the third of four children born to Patrick McGrath and Violet Maud (née Mitchley). Their Q1 1908 marriage had been registered in Wandsworth, and the 1911 census records the mid 20s couple living at 62 Broomwood Road, Clapham Common, with Patrick's occupation listed as a "Grocer's Assistant". The births of all four children were registered in that Wandsworth District: Eileen Q1 1911; Brian Q4 1918; Patricia Q3 1920; and Maureen Q1 1927.

At some point, the McGrath family then moved to the Borough, where the September 1939 Register records the parents living at 64 Bradstock Road, Stoneleigh. Patrick is now listed as an "Insurance Inspector" and Violet with the conventional "Unpaid Domestic Duties". There are three currently closed records at the address, one of which is likely to be the 19 year old Patricia.

On 16 January 1945, Herbert was the Air Bomber of Lancaster NG147, AP-C. At 23.15, the aircraft took off from 186 Squadron's base of RAF Stradishall, Suffolk, to take part in a mass bombing raid (involving a total of 138 aircraft from 3 Group) on a synthetic oil plant at Wanne-Eickel, near Dortmund. Some 3 minutes after take off, the aircraft crashed at Kedington (near Haverhill, Suffolk) and, with its full bomb load, exploded on impact killing all seven of the crew, who were:-
F/Lt R R Tait, Pilot,
Sgt P A Sumpter, F/Eng
F/Sgt T B Darney, Navigator,
F/O H C Dutfield, Air Bomber,
F/Sgt W S Gamble W/Op.,
P/O G S Haslam, Mu/Gunner
Sgt T L Lenton, Tail Gunner.
The crew of Lancaster NG147 AP-C (but taken in front of NG137)
The crew of Lancaster NG147 AP-C (but taken in front of NG137)
Picture courtesy of Alistair Taylor via aircrewremembered.com

Herbert and three others of the crew were buried in Haverhill Cemetery, Suffolk, which holds 44 WW2 Commonwealth casualties - mainly airmen from the nearby RAF bases. The widowed Patricia took the option of adding a personal inscription to Herbert's headstone on Grave U.149,
"In memory of Herbert Charles beloved husband of Patricia. One we loved and shall never forget."
Patricia stayed in the Borough after her marriage to Herbert (perhaps with her parents at 64 Bradstock Road): the Commonwealth War Graves Commission's post-war records note the widowed Patricia as being "of Ewell, Surrey". There is no record of Herbert and Patricia having any children from their just 12 months of marriage. In Q2 1949, again registered in the local Surrey Mid Eastern District, Patricia got married again - to George J W Lucas.

Brian Bouchard © 2017
Updated by Roger Morgan 2018

Please contact the Webmaster if you have information or pictures that can extend this entry.

Back to the index


DWAN Arthur William

Civilian
Died 22 January 1941, aged 15

Not listed in the Book of Remembrance

Arthur was born on 18 November 1925, the eighth of twelve children born to George C Dwan and Lily S (née Turner). Their Q4 1914 marriage and the births of all their children were registered in the St Olave, Southwark District. The 1939 Register records the parents (with George as "Cereal Miller's Forman") and eight of their children - including 14 year old schoolboy Arthur - living at Rotherhithe Street, Rotherhithe.

After the Battle of Britain, the next phase of WW2 was the "Blitz", the Luftwaffe's bombing campaign against London and other major centres. This began with a daylight raid of the London Docks on 7 September 1940. There was great damage to the Docks and the surrounding area. Many of the surviving residents were evacuated to the nearby Keeton's Road School.

A second wave of the Blitz came that evening, during which the school received a direct hit. It is reported that some 400 of the evacuees were killed outright. Others, including the 14 year old Arthur (and Rose Bond) were injured. He was taken to the Horton Emergency Hospital at Epsom - one of Epsom's cluster of mental hospitals that, as for WW1, had been taken over for handling wartime casualties - and, four months later, died there from his injuries on 22 January 1941.

Roger Morgan © 2017

Please contact the Webmaster if you have information or pictures that can extend this entry.

Back to the index




Please Note: We believe that the information on this page is accurate however users should satisfy themselves that the information is correct before incurring any expense or undertaking any journeys. This is particularly important when purchasing certificates from other bodies, for example the General Register Office. You might like to use the following links to Freebmd and Find My Past (Links open in a new window).

War Memorials
War Memorials
All Saints
All Saints
Dipping Well
Dipping Well
Ashley Road
Ashley Road
St Mary's Ewell
St Mary's Ewell
Sgt. Green and the Epsom Riot
Epsom Riot
Woodcote Camp
Woodcote Camp